Snoqualmie Casino holds active shooter training

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KING COUNTY, Wash. -- Active shooter training scenarios have become an important exercise in light of the recent mass shootings we’ve seen across the country.

On Wednesday at Snoqualmie Casino employees got a first-hand training course from the FBI on what to do if they ever find themselves in a mass shooting situation.

“Every time we hear about one of these tragedies it feels like it hits closer to home," said Brian Decorah, CEO of Snoqualmie Casino.

Snoqualmie Casino invited tribal casino employees from across the area as well as nearby business partners to participate in the preparedness training.

As part of the training, employees learned how to become more aware of their surroundings. Participants also got to hear what live gunfire from an M4 assault rifle sounds like.

“Seconds matter in an active shooter situation," Decorah explained. "If you recognize the sound of a gunshot you can respond quicker.”

Deron Roberts is the casino's head of security and a former FBI agent.

“You don’t want to find yourself in a situation where you are in total shock," said Roberts.

The training also included information on how to stop bleeding if someone is severely injured. The casino has trauma packs placed throughout in different locations, and inside there are useful supplies like a tourniquet, gauze, and scissors.

“I never want to see [employees] walking around with a mobile phone where you see on social media people running around going oh my goodness; I’d rather them find some cloth or find a victim to help treat," said Roberts.

Casino officials say this type of awareness and training helps their employees leave prepared and not paranoid.

"It’s sad the times we live in but it’s a reality we’re faced with," Roberts explained. "You don't have to walk around paranoid."

While the casino already has security and police on patrol they’re also beefing up their law enforcement presence as another measure to keep employees and guests safe.

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