Report: Russell Wilson sets April 15 deadline to get new deal from Seahawks

Russell Wilson #3 of the Seattle Seahawks scrambles in the pocket against the Dallas Cowboys in the first half during the Wild Card Round at AT&T Stadium on January 05, 2019 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

RENTON, Wash. — Quarterback Russell Wilson has given the Seattle Seahawks until April 15 to finish negotiations on a contract extension, according to reports.

Wilson is set to earn $17 million in base salary this year, which is the last year of a 4-year extension his signed in 2015. That contract was worth $87.6 million.

Insiders say it’s not unusual for teams to lock in franchise quarterbacks to long-term deals prior to their final contract year.

The 30-year-old’s average annual salary — $21.9 million — puts him at 12th in the NFL for quarterbacks.

The news was first reported on Tuesday by The Seattle Times.

According to the Times, it’s unclear what would happen if a new deal isn’t made by April 15 which is the beginning of the team’s first official offseason workout program.

Wilson would likely prefer not to have questions about his future linger over the next few months and into training camp at the end of July. His last contract extension was announced on the first day of training camp back in 2015.

Wilson is likely seeking around $35 million per season.

Q13 Sports Director Aaron Levine asked General Manager John Schneider at the NFL Combine in February about how complicated negotiations with Wilson could be.

“I wouldn’t think it would be that difficult. The first one he was taking such a big jump. He’s more established now and he’s up there already — he’s in that class of quarterbacks. It’s pretty awesome.”

Last week at league meetings, Carroll said that the two sides have been in communication.

If a new deal is not done before next March, the Seahawks have the option to place the franchise tag on Wilson for next season, which would guarantee him more than $30 million for the 2020 season.

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