James Mayers: Western District of Washington Violent Offender Task Force searching for suspected drug ring fugitive

WANTED BY U.S. MARSHALS IN SEATTLE —
If you know where the U.S. Marshals led Western District of Washington Violent Offender Task Force can find 39-year-old James L. Mayers, Crime Stoppers of Puget Sound will pay you a cash reward of up to $1,000. Submit an anonymous tip at http://www.P3Tips.com or by calling 1-800-222-8477 or use the P3 Tips App on your cell phone.

Seattle Police say Mayers is a known gang member.

He is wanted on Federal Charges for Possession of a Firearm in Furtherance of a Drug Trafficking Crime, Conspiracy to Distribute Controlled Substances and Possession of Illegal Drugs with Intent to Distribute.

He’s 5’10” and weighs 175 pounds.

Prosecutors say he is one of more than 40 suspects identified last year in a massive bust led by the DEA, FBI and Seattle Police throughout King, Pierce, Snohomish, Skagit and Thurston counties that seized 75 guns, more than 95 pounds of methamphetamine, more than 32 pounds of heroin, more than 7 pounds of cocaine (both crack and powder) as well as ecstasy and fentanyl. More than $327,000 in cash and 22 vehicles also were seized. Associates of some of the traffickers were shot and some killed in various shooting incidents in both Seattle and south King County.

“These strategic operations have stopped some of the most violent criminal groups operating throughout the Puget Sound Region from pushing dangerous drugs onto our communities most vulnerable members facing life or death struggles against addiction," said DEA Special Agent in Charge Keith Weis.

This was an Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) investigation, providing supplemental federal funding to the federal and state agencies involved. This investigation was led by the Seattle Police Department Gang and Narcotics Units, FBI Seattle Safe Streets Task Force, and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Other agencies providing investigative assistance include ATF, USMS, and the U.S Bureau of Prisons.

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