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Pierce County crews prepping for next snow storm

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FREDERICKSON, Wash. – While road crews in the South Sound are wrapping up from the first storm, they are also about to gear up for the next.

Plus, there are still many areas in central Pierce County that are still thawing out. Some neighbors worry they won’t get much of a break from the winter weather.

Today is the lull between storm systems but road crews in Frederickson are already gearing up for the expected snow storm.

The county says it has approximately 40 trucks of varying size that can deliver plows, ice, sand and brine to help keep your traction on the roads.

“Oh, it’s super icy,” said driver Misty Gochnauer.

Most roads in Pierce County aren’t still covered in slush and ice but if your neighborhood is hiding in the shadows, Monday’s snow storm is still covering the ground.

“A lot of people are actually taking it pretty slow,” said Gochnauer.

By Wednesday many of the main roads through Pierce County were faring pretty well but the next storm has county road crews prepping for another round.

Crews have already begun distributing salt to strategic locations across the county so trucks will have plenty of material to work with when the snow begins to fall.

“We’ve had crews working 12-hour alternate shifts since Sunday evening getting through this first wave,” said Mike Lowman with the county.

More than 150 employees are planning to span across the county to work 28 regions – about 50 lane miles per crew for this week’s coming storm.

“What’s coming in is going to have more snow,” said Lowman, “Maybe slightly warmer temps but more snow.”

Crews are responsible for clearing about 1,700 miles of roadways that connect neighborhoods to services and state highways. If the snow really starts coming down crews will focus on major arterials and help keep lifeline emergency routes open and available.

“We have supervisors and drivers in the field reporting back,” said Lowman “We’re well versed enough to realize that and (the need) to fall back. Hopefully we don’t get to that point, but we do have a plan for it.”

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