Seattle Police release body camera video in deadly officer-involved shooting

SEATTLE -- Seattle Police have released body camera video of a deadly officer-involved shooting in north Seattle.

The incident started as a traffic stop in the Licton Springs neighborhood at about 5 p.m. Monday.  Seattle Police on Thursday evening released footage from five police-worn body cameras and a dash camera showing a man, identified by friends and family as Iosia Faletogo, run from police before struggling with officers and being shot.

Warning: Video contains graphic content

It happened in the area of Aurora Avenue N and 96th Street.  Police say they pulled over the car Faletogo was in because of an improper lane change. The car was also flagged in the system because the "registered owner had a suspended license," police said Thursday in a release.

After a few moments, video shows him suddenly take off running.

Officers run after him and then there's a struggle as police try to get him to the ground. Officers are heard warning him that he may be shot if he doesn't relent.

Seattle Police say Faletogo was in possession of a stolen handgun at the time of the shooting. They said he also was carrying $1,160 in cash and a vial containing 263 pills with the code for oxycodone stamped on them. The pills tested positive for fentanyl and acetaminophen.

The video released by police was edited to show the chase and subsequent struggle from different officers' perspectives.

When asked for additional comment on the footage, Seattle Police Det. Mark Jamieson said the video spoke for itself.

Faletogo's family is scheduled to hold a news conference Friday to talk about the case.

The Seattle Police Department's Force Investigation Team (FIT) is investigating the shooting. The NAACP on Thursday also called on King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg to order an independent investigation into Faletogo's death.

The officer who shot Faletogo is on paid leave pending the outcome of the FIT investigation, police said. Their name was not released, but the department said they were hired in September 2015.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.