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Seahawks’ Tyler Lockett opens up about dating, saving himself for marriage and having a positive impact

SEATTLE -- There's no questions Seahawks wide receiver Tyler Lockett can fly. He is having his best season to date, scoring three touchdowns over the first four games. But off the field, he's a little more grounded.

Over the summer, Lockett was on Mercer Island teaching the game of football to local kids. It's his work with children that motivates him - both on and off the Gridiron.

"It gives you a reason to keep going," Lockett said.

Football is in Lockett's blood. His father, Kevin Lockett, and his uncle Aaron both played professionally. Kevin played eight years in the NFL, racking up more than 1,700 yards as a wide receiver.

Some would feel the pressure to live up to their father. But Tyler said he is past that.

"Even when we have conversations now on the league, he (is father) tells me I've surpassed everything he's done in the NFL," Lockett said.

Lockett loves inspiring kids when he is away from the practice field. He also finds time to balance his personal life. It isn't always easy as a professional athlete. Neither is the dating lifestyle when you're in the NFL.

"You got to find somebody who likes you for you," Lockett said. "Not what you do."

Lockett is open and honest about his personal life. He said he is saving himself for marriage. The proclamation garnered some publicity, but he doesn't think too much of it.

"I don't see it as anything personal," Lockett said. "I just put it in a poem."

Lockett seems to focus more on his poetry, playing the piano (he's quite talented), and finding ways to connect with kids. During a Make-A-Wish, Steven Snider of Yakima who lives with cerebral palsy and uses a wheelchair to get around, gave all the Seahawks players he met a bracelet with Steven's name printed on it. The Snider family couldn't believe it when Lockett wore Steven's bracelett during a game.

Then to another game. Then off the field. All captured on camera.

The bracelet had a simple message of "Steven Rocks and Dream Big." To Snider, seeing Lockett wear it meant the world.

"It means a lot to me because I'm a big Seahawks fans," Snider said.

Lockett sees the impact he can have on others.  For him, that will stick with him longer than his time under the bright lights.

"When I die, I die happy," Lockett said. "So when they look in my casket I have a smirk on my face because I know I did everything I was supposed to."