NTSB says blown engine of Southwest flight shows evidence of ‘metal fatigue’

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The National Transportation Safety Board says a preliminary examination of the blown jet engine of the Southwest Airlines plane that made an emergency landing in Philadelphia shows evidence of "metal fatigue."

In a late night news conference, NTSB Chairman Robert Sumwalt said one of the engine's fan blades was separated and missing. Sumwalt says the blade was separated at the point where it would come into the hub and there was evidence of metal fatigue.

One person was killed and seven others were injured after the twin-engine 737 blew an engine at 30,000 feet and got hit by shrapnel that smashed a window. The plane from New York to Dallas landed in Philadelphia.

Sumwalt says part of the engine covering was found in Bernville, Pennsylvania, about 70 miles west of Philadelphia.

Southwest Airlines says it's speeding up inspections of engines like the one that failed and sent debris smashing into a plane window, leading to the death of a passenger.

Southwest said Tuesday it expects to finish inspections of the CFM56 engines over the next 30 days. It says it's making the move out of caution.

The engines are made by CFM International, a joint venture of General Electric Co. and France's Safran SA. Southwest and CFM are both promising to assist federal officials in the investigation.

One person was killed and seven others were injured after the twin-engine 737 blew an engine at 30,000 feet and got hit by shrapnel that smashed a window. The plane from New York to Dallas landed in Philadelphia.