Seahawks host football safety clinic for moms

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showing off our Seahawk pride in Aberdeen WA. We are ready for the game! Go Hawks!!!

SEATTLE – The Seattle Seahawks know many parents worry about whether it’s safe for their kids to play football. So tonight, they hosted a clinic for moms to learn more about safety and concussion protocol.

“I’ve always thought moms had the final decision in the household if the child plays any sport,” says Paul Johns, Seahawks Director of Youth Football. 

A UW study released last week found up to two million children across the country suffer from concussions every year, and some of those concussions can be deadly. Last fall, Evergreen High School player Kenny Bui died after going down and suffering a head injury during a game. 

Jackie Wright says seeing what can happen on the field is part of the reason she got involved with her son’s Fox Island football league.

“I’m fine with my kid playing,” she says. “I know we do our best to teach the kids how to be safe.” 

But she attended this clinic because she wanted to make sure she knows about the best helmets and equipment available for her kids. She also wanted to see for herself if her kids are learning the safest tackling techniques. 

Darla Meise says taking part in drills tonight helped reassure her that her sons are doing the right things on the field. 

“They started playing at 4 and 5, and they’ve had heads up football from the beginning. I’ve been lucky that we’ve had excellent coaches,” she says.

Former Seahawks players encourage more moms and family members to learn more about the game and how to minimize the risks of their kids getting injured.   

“Go to practice, go see who’s coaching your son, see exactly what they’re telling them,” says Edwin Bailey. 

The Seahawks say they will be having clinics for parents at least once a year.

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