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Seahawks trade up in second round to pick Alabama defensive tackle Jarran Reed

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SEATTLE – The Seattle Seahawks made a somewhat uncharacteristic move Friday night, trading up in the second round to select Alabama defensive tackle Jarran Reed.

The Seahawks traded their second rounder and fourth-rounder to the Chicago Bears for the No. 49 overall pick.

Reed was thought to be a first-round talent by many after finishing on the second-team all-SEC defensive team last year.

Seattle general manager John Schneider said after the first round that the defensive line was the other consideration for the Seahawks when they picked at No. 31 overall.

Reed is a major fit after the Seahawks lost run-stopping defensive tackle Brandon Mebane in free agency.

Reed – who told reporters he was eating Skittles when he got the call – has had a busy month after welcoming new daughter Jacie on April 8.

“I gotta grind hard for her,” he said.

 

Reed said his strong suits include stopping the run, being dominant and physical, and being a good teammate.

“I get along with everybody,” he said.

He had 55 tackles and a sack his junior year and considered entering the draft a year ago, but the 6-foot-2, 307-pounder decided to play out his senior season with the Crimson Tide.

Last season, he racked up 53 tackles and another sack as a run-stuffing tackle.

Reed apparently has an affinity for Seattle sports; six weeks ago, he posted a selfie on Instagram in which he was wearing a Mariners hat and Seahawks shirt.

He played two seasons at East Mississippi Community College before transferring to Alabama.

Seattle traded away its own second-round pick (No. 56 overall) and its fourth-rounder, the 124th overall pick, to move up.

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