Governor Inslee wants you in a new (electric) car

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OLYMPIA – Governor Jay Inslee wants drivers in Washington State to go ‘electric,’ and he’s offering big incentives to get them to do so. The Governor wants to see more electric vehicles on the road, and he’s willing to spend millions of taxpayer dollars to make it happen, the Herald of Everett reported.

For one, the Governor wants to let drivers of electric vehicles to travel at no cost on state ferries and in toll lanes. Another incentive: waiving the sales tax on purchases of alternative-fuel vehicles, the paper reported.

Governor Inslee wants to make it cheaper and easier to own an electric vehicle, hoping to boost the number of alternative-fuel vehicles from 10,000 today to 50,000 by 2020.

The Governor’s plans have received a mixed reaction from the State Legislature, where there has been more criticism than praise, the Herald reported.

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19 comments

  • Spam and Rice

    Perhaps Gov Inslee should focus more on managing the hoard of money he intends to steal from Washtonians. There are plenty of single mums who will not be able to afford a posh electric car, there are many students and graduates who are being fleeced on taxes and living pay check to pay check.
    Perhaps the gov should come down from his moral high ground and stop robbing the people who pay him, he could also remember his place as an administrator of the peoples will and not an aspiring lord

    • Cynical

      Pretty illogical proposal when the state is complaining that, due to reduced gas taxes from people driving hybrids, we don’t have enough gas taxes to maintain the roads. Hence, we have to increase gas taxes by a whopping $1.17 per gallon AND increase tolls AND conduct a pilot program for monitoring and taxing road usage via GPS devices in our cars AND change the HOV lanes on 405 from 2+ to 3+ and still require a transponder so thy they can charge a toll to those 3+ person carpools. But hey – why should our governor propose anything logical?!

  • Donna Ross

    How can he afford to do this with no extra money in our state? State cutbacks have to be reversed before he can spend anymore money.

    • DaveinOlyWA

      the benefits of going to an electric commute is HUGE! there is a video bouncing around out there that uses a special camera that shows Carbon Dioxide and Carbon Monoxide. If you commute, your are drowning in a sea of it. CO is poison. As an adult, your system can handle it better but young children (especially under aged 2) can be affected causing life long issues. the hidden medical costs is 100X more than the cost of these proposals

    • Michael

      Well you have to realize that the power companies are probably paying him personal incentives to do this. Who cares what people can afford, and what the people think.

  • Kip

    Won’t work with gas prices coming down so fast. Why spend the money for an electric vehicle. Check the stock prices on electric vehicle manufactures.

  • WattEVr

    “offering big incentives” doesn’t sound like incentives at all. I seriously doubt very many people would decide to buy electric for HOV lanes, fares and tolls. In fact, the number of those people would be so small that it would probably be cheaper to just go full Oprah and start giving away Nissan LEAFs.

    The real issues deterring people from electric vehicles has been price and driving range per charge. The price issue is helped through the federal tax incentives that effectively accelerated the depreciation of EVs to a point where now people can get into a fully financed used car with a payment + extra electricity cost that favorably compares the gas they’re buying for a car that is paid off.

    If he really wants to encourage more people to drive EVs then I think it would be better to create tax incentives for employers and business owners to install charging stations where people spend a lot of time away from home. Employers could then tout their greenness and robustness of their employee perks. Businesses could benefit from consumers spending more time in their stores, restaurants, movie theaters, shopping malls, etc. The cost of the incentives could be offset by either an increase to the annual license fees for EV drivers or an option to just pay more per KWh on their electric bill.

  • James Blair

    Electric cars require pollution to generate the electricity because it doesn’t magically appear out of thin air or the damming of rivers (and damning the fish and wildlife around them). That’s the reason for new dams being built, like at Sunset Falls on the Skykomish river. How green is that? http://www.savetheskyriver.org/

  • David G Onkels

    Let’s hear it for coal-fired cars! The buyer of a $100,000 Tesla really needs that sales tax exemption and those free ferry fares, too, don’t you think? The Governor doesn’t think about second order effects, obviously.

  • Tim

    I’m not rich. I only got the Chevy Volt because it costs less (after tax rebate) than the Prius or the Outback which were my other choices. I wouldn’t buy it just for the free ride on the ferry or HOV lane, I consider these as only advertising space. After 3 months and 3800 miles, I used 99% electric, 1% gas. And so much more quiet to drive, more fun, more zippy, costs $1 in electric for every 33 miles, and expense (initial and maintenance) is less than a gas car. Can’t lose with promotion of EV imho.

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