Story Summary

N. Korea holds American from Lynnwood

The U.S. government has confirmed that Kenneth Bae, an American citizen who lives in Lynnwood, was being held by North Korea. He was there on a tourist trip when he was taken into custody.

 

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Local News
02/10/14

Kenneth Bae worried about his health in North Korean camp

SEATTLE — Kenneth Bae, a Korean-American being held in North Korea, says he is worried about his health after authorities moved him back into a labor camp following a stay in a hospital.

“I know if I continue for the next several months here, I will probably be sent back to the hospital again,” Bae says in a video of a conversation with a Swedish diplomat recorded Friday.

Footage of the conversation in the labor camp was released by Choson Sinbo, a pro-North Korean newspaper based in Japan that has been given access to Bae in the past.

baeWearing a gray jacket with the prisoner number “103″ marked on it, Bae tells the Swedish diplomat, Cecilia Anderberg, that he thinks he’s already lost as much as 10 pounds in weight since he was transferred back to the camp a few weeks ago.

He expresses hope that North Korea will allow a U.S. envoy to visit for talks about his case.

But those hopes appeared to have been dashed over the weekend.

A State Department official said Sunday that North Korea had rescinded its invitation to the envoy, Ambassador Robert King, without giving a reason.

Hours later, the North’s state-run Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) reported that former U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Donald Gregg had arrived in Pyongyang.

The brief KCNA report Monday didn’t state the purpose of the visit by Gregg, the chairman of the Pacific Century Institute, a U.S. nonprofit group that aims to promote education, dialogue and research in the Pacific region.

Bae, of Lynwood, Washington, was arrested in November 2012 in Rason, along North Korea’s northeastern coast. Pyongyang sentenced him last year to 15 years of hard labor, accusing him of planning to bring down the government through religious activities.

He is widely reported to have been carrying out Christian missionary work in North Korea.

Bae’s family released this statement Monday:

Several recent events have alarmed our family about the status of Kenneth Bae – who is a beloved son, father, husband, and brother. We are saddened to hear that the invitation extended to the State Department by DPRK (North Korea) has, once again, been rescinded.

We are also distressed to learn that Kenneth was sent back to the labor camp on Jan. 20, which gives our family renewed urgency to bring him home. Kenneth suffers from chronic medical conditions that require treatment, including severe back pain. We remain gravely concerned that the stress Kenneth endures at the labor camp will be too much for him. We do not know whether his body will be able to withstand the strains of hard labor, eight hours a day, six days a week.

While we reel from this heartbreaking news, we are encouraged by the growing chorus of advocates, asking for Kenneth to be released.

In particular, we are thankful to Rev. Jesse Jackson, a true advocate for Kenneth. We have been speaking with Rev. Jackson for the last few weeks. We are pleased that Rev. Jackson has agreed to undertake a humanitarian mission to seek Kenneth’s release, if granted permission to do so from the DPRK. We fully support his efforts.

My mother and I had the opportunity to meet with Rev. Jackson and have been touched by his warmth, generosity of spirit, and his investment in bringing Kenneth home. Regardless of the outcome, we are deeply grateful to Rev. Jackson for his proactive pursuits of Kenneth’s freedom.

We hope and pray that DPRK and US diplomats will resume talks soon, ultimately leading to Kenneth’s release.

It has been 474 days since Kenneth has been detained in the DPRK. Kenneth is just an ordinary American father of three who is desperately trying to return to his family. We plead with leaders of both nations to work together to let this US citizen come home to his family.  

‘I have not lost hope’

Bae, 45, operated a China-based company specializing in tours of North Korea, according to his family, who have described him as a devout Christian.

He was transferred to a hospital last year after his health deteriorated. But last week the United States said he had been moved back to a labor camp, a development his family described as “devastating.”

In the video, Bae asks the Swedish diplomat to tell his family that “I have not lost hope and have not given up anything.”

But says he is concerned that if his situation isn’t resolved soon, it could “drag on” for months longer. He notes that annual U.S.-South Korean military drills due to start later this month may deepen tensions in the region, as they did last year.

State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki on Sunday expressed disappointment that Ambassador Robert King’s visit was called off and noted North Korea had said it wouldn’t use Bae as a “political bargaining trip.” It is the second time North Korea has canceled a planned visit by King.

Psaki said that the joint military exercises are “in no way linked to Mr. Bae’s case.”

North Korea has been urging the South not to take part in the drills — a call that Seoul and Washington have rejected.

The Rev. Jesse Jackson, the U.S. civil rights leader, has offered, at the request of Bae’s family, to “travel to Pyongyang on a humanitarian mission focused on Bae’s release,” Psaki said.

Life in the camp

In the conversation Friday, Bae discusses details of his health problems, as well as the minutiae of life in the labor camp.

He says he is suffering from back pain and neck pain, making the eight hours of manual labor he does each day “very difficult.”

“I’ve been working with my hands a lot,” Bae tells the diplomat. “My hands all got numb and sore I have some cuts.”

But he says that he remains “strong mentally and spiritually, and I am trying to stay strong emotionally as well.”

Bae tells the diplomat that he has access to books and television at the camp and that the staff there treat him “very fairly.”

The TV antenna stopped working for a couple of weeks recently, he says, allowing him to spend “more time with the Lord, with the Bible.”

“That was actually a pretty good time for me,” Bae says.

Sweden represents U.S. interests in North Korea because the United States has no diplomatic presence in the secretive state.

“We again call on the DPRK to grant Bae special amnesty and immediate release as a humanitarian gesture so he may reunite with his family and seek medical care,” Psaki of the State Department said Sunday. “We will continue to work actively to secure Mr. Bae’s release.”

From CNN 

(CNN) — Kenneth Bae, the Lynnwood man jailed in North Korea for 15 months, has been moved from a hospital back to a labor camp, the State Department announced Friday.

baeDepartment spokeswoman Jen Psaki said in a statement that the United States was “deeply concerned” by the development.

“We also remain gravely concerned about Mr. Bae’s health” and again urged Pyongyang to grant him “special amnesty and immediate release on humanitarian grounds,” she said.

Bae was arrested in November 2012 in Rason, along North Korea’s northeastern coast.

A devout Christian and father of three operated a China-based company specializing in tours of North Korea, according to his family and freekennow.com, a website that friends set up to promote his release.

The North Korean government accused Bae of planning to bring down the government through religious activities.

Last month, he told reporters that he had committed a “serious crime” in the secretive nation and that he had not experienced abusive treatment by the regime.

NEW YORK — Dennis Rodman says he’s not a diplomat, just a former NBA star fighting addiction and trying to be a better father.

But that hasn’t kept him from becoming embroiled, even if unintentionally, in U.S.-North Korea relations.

His apparent chumminess with North Korea’s leader has been controversial, as have previous proclamations that Kim Jong Un is a “nice guy.”

Rodman said he simply does not know enough about the allegations of abuse and authoritarianism that Kim is reviled for.

“I keep telling people, I’m not there to be an ambassador to try to figure out why (is Kim) doing all these things? That’s not my job,” Rodman told CNN’s Chris Cuomo on “New Day” Friday.

Former NBA Star Dennis Rodman Visits China

From Getty Images

It was his first interview since entering an alcohol rehabilitation facility two weeks ago.

The former basketball player is probably the American with the most access to the North Korean leader, and many have been critical that he has not lobbied for the release of American prisoner Kenneth Bae from a labor camp.

“I’m not an ambassador, and I tried to strive and tell people, just because I know the marshal (Kim), that doesn’t mean I know the marshal like that,” he said.

Rodman says he didn’t mean to insinuate during an earlier interview this month that he knew why Bae, a Korean-American, was being held in North Korea.

“To this day I still don’t know what he did,” Rodman said, even offering to take Bae’s place if he could.

“I feel for (Bae’s family). I feel for them deeply. … I would do anything literally. This is Dennis Rodman talking. If they (North Korea) said, ‘We’ll take Dennis Rodman and we’ll let Kenenth Bae go,’ I’ll say, ‘You know what? I’ll do that. … Take me.’”

‘I drink… because I’m bored’

The North Korea topic was important, but Friday’s interview was as much about Rodman’s personal struggles with addiction.

“I’ve always been a party animal,” Rodman said.

But he said this is a great time for him to reflect publicly and put himself at peace with a “lot of stuff that has been going on” over the past 18 months.

“I think for me, the reason I drink is because I’m bored,” he said.

“Am I an alcoholic? Absolutely,” Rodman said.

Asked whether he was drunk during his first interview with Cuomo when Rodman was in North Korea earlier this month, the former NBA star said he drank with his teammates beforehand, but declined to say whether he was drunk.

“It wasn’t about me being in the right mind,” he said.

This month, the colorful basketball Hall of Famer, who won five NBA titles with the Detroit Pistons and Chicago Bulls, organized a team of former professional basketball stars to go to North Korea for a game that was played on Kim’s birthday.

The players were criticized for traveling to the secretive state, a nation accused of human rights abuses. North Korea also has pursued a nuclear program, despite warnings from the United States and other Western powers.

Rodman said his actions in North Korea do not make him a bad person.

“I’m not a traitor,” Rodman said. “My whole goal is to make people happy.”

During the live interview, the former professional basketball player extended an invitation to take Cuomo to North Korea to meet its leader, and decide for himself what kind of person Kim is.

Fellow player Charles Smith defended the visit as a mission of basketball diplomacy, where sportsmen would share cultural ideas with each other.

While there — in what was his fourth trip to North Korea — Rodman spoke to Cuomo in an at-times heated interview. The sunglasses-wearing Rodman began yelling at the CNN anchor as he defended the team’s visit.

“You know, you’ve got 10 guys here, 10 guys here, that have left their families, they’ve left their damn families, to help this country in a sports venture. That’s 10 guys, all these guys here, do anyone understand that?”

“We do,” responded Cuomo. “And we appreciate that and we wish them well with cultural exchange.”

“No, no, no, no,” Rodman continued. “I don’t give a rat’s ass what the hell you think. I’m saying to you, look at these guys here, look at them … they dared to do one thing, they came here.”

And Rodman also implied that Bae, held prisoner for 15 months by the regime, was guilty of a crime, but he did not specify what offense.

“Do you understand what he did in this country?” Rodman asked Cuomo, who tried to interject. “No, no, no, you tell me, you tell me. Why is he held captive here in this country, why?”

“I would love to speak on this,” Rodman said, before abruptly switching topic to talk about how his fellow basketball players had left their families behind to come to North Korea for the exhibition game.

Bae, of Lynwood, Washington, was arrested in November 2012 in Rason, along North Korea’s northeastern coast. The devout Christian and father of three operated a China-based company specializing in tours of North Korea, according to his family and freekennow.com, a website that friends set up to promote his release.

Rodman later apologized for his remarks about Bae. And his longtime agent, Darren Prince, said his client had fallen victim to stress and drinking.

“He is embarrassed, saddened and remorseful for the anger and hurt his words have caused,” Prince said in announcing that Rodman was in rehab.

 

LYNNWOOD, Wash. — The sister of Kenneth Bae, a U.S. citizen being held in North Korea, said in a statement Monday that she apologizes on his behalf for whatever the government thinks he did wrong and “humbly ask for your mercy to release my brother.”

Terri Chung, Bae’s sister, released the statement after her brother appeared at a televised news conference and admitted he had committed a “serious crime” against North Korea, which he said does “not abuse human rights,” according to China’s state-run news agency Xinhua.

He urged the United States to cooperate with North Korea to secure his release, said Xinhua, which has a presence in Pyongyang.

“To the leaders of DPRK, we understand that Kenneth has been convicted of crimes under DPRK laws,” Chung said. “Our family sincerely apologizes on Kenneth’s behalf. Kenneth has also acknowledged his crimes and has apologized. He has now served 15 months of his sentence, but faces chronic health problems. We humbly ask for your mercy to release my brother.”

Any statement made by Bae in captivity would be sanctioned by the North Korean government, whose widespread human rights abuses are known to the world.

kenneth bae1

The country has a long history of exacting false “confessions.”

In December, 85-year-old Merrill Newman, a veteran of the Korean War, was freed from captivity in North Korea after being forced to give a false confession, he said afterward.

“Anyone who has read the text of it or who has seen the video of me reading it knows that the words were not mine and were not delivered voluntarily. Anyone who knows me knows that I could not have done the things they had me ‘confess’ to,” he wrote.

Bae was arrested in November 2012 in Rason along North Korea’s northeastern coast. The devout Christian and father of three operated a China-based company specializing in tours of North Korea, according to his family and freekennow.com, a website friends set up to promote his release.

“Several years ago, Kenneth saw an opportunity that combined his entrepreneurial spirit with his personal convictions as a Christian,” the site said. “He believed in showing compassion to the North Korean people by contributing to their economy in the form of tourism.”

LYNNWOOD, Wash. — The family of Washington state resident Kenneth Bae, imprisoned in North Korea for the past 14 months, said Thursday they accept Dennis Rodman’s apology “for his outrageous outburst” about Bae while in Pyongyang.

“As Rodman has stated, being drunk and stressed is not an excuse for what he said, but we acknowledge he is human and we all do make mistakes,” said the statement issued by Terri Chung, Bae’s sister.

chung

Terri Chung of Lynnwood, sister of Kenneth Bae, who has been imprisoned in North Korea.

“Our greatest concern remains the health and freedom of my brother Kenneth. We hope and pray that Rodman’s comments and ongoing antics have not further endangered my brother. Kenneth’s health and freedom are precarious.

“The fact is Kenneth’s life is on the line … to our family, this situation is no joke. This is not a game.

“We urgently ask everyone who is hearing this or reading this to advocate for my brother, including Dennis Rodman if he cares to do so,” the statement said, adding the family again asks the North Korean government “for mercy and grant Kenneth amnesty immediately.”

Bae, a U.S. citizen and tour operator, was arrested in North Korea in 2012, convicted last spring by North Korea of “hostile acts” intended to topple the government, and sentenced to 15 years in a labor camp.

Rodman, while visiting North Korea, implied in an interview with CNN that Bae had done something wrong that led to his imprisonment. But would not say what. His comments were widely condemned.

On Thursday, Rodman’s publicist released a statement from Rodman apologizing for his comments:

“I want to apologize. I take full responsibility for my actions. It had been a very stressful day … I had been drinking. It’s not an excuse but by the time the interview happened I was upset. I was overwhelmed. It’s not an excuse, it’s just the truth. I want to first apologize to Kenneth Bae’s family….”

 

 

 

 

 

PYONGYANG, North Korea (CNN) — Dennis Rodman apologized to Kenneth Bae’s family Thursday for his remarks about the Washington state man who has been imprisoned in North Korea for the past 14 months.

rodman_AP500097816799In an interview Tuesday with CNN, Rodman — who was in North Korea with other former NBA players for a game with North Korean players — was asked if he should be in that country considering recent events in North Korea and the fact that Bae, a U.S. citizen who was arrested in North Korea, convicted last spring by North Korea of “hostile acts” intended to topple the government and sentenced to 15 years in a labor camp.

In response, Rodman suggested the Korean-American from Lynnwood, Wash., had done something wrong, but did not specify what.

“Do you understand what he did in this country?” Rodman asked CNN’s Chris Cuomo.

“You tell me, what did he do?” Cuomo asked.

“No, no, no, you tell me, you tell me,” Rodman said. “Why is he held captive here in this country, why? … I would love to speak on this.”

Cuomo encouraged him to elaborate, but Rodman declined.

Bae’s sister, Terri Chung, said in an interview with Q13 FOX News late Tuesday that Rodman’s remarks were outrageous.

“It’s one thing to play games with his own image, but this is not a game, this is a man’s life,” Chung said.

“He has refused to help, that’s his choice, but instead he has chosen to make these outrageous accusations that he clearly doesn’t know anything about,” she added.

She said her brother was in North Korea legally working as a tour operator. She hoped one of the former basketball players would take a chance to ask for amnesty for him.

On Thursday, Rodman’s publicist released a statement from Rodman apologizing for his comments:

“I want to apologize. I take full responsibility for my actions. It had been a very stressful day. Some of my teammates were leaving because of pressure from their families and business associates. My dreams of basketball diplomacy was quickly falling apart. I had been drinking. It’s not an excuse but by the time the interview happened I was upset. I was overwhelmed. It’s not an excuse, it’s just the truth. I want to first apologize to Kenneth Bae’s family. I want to apologize to my teammates and my management team. I also want to apologize to Chris Cuomo. I embarrassed a lot of people. I’m very sorry. At this point I should know better than to make political statements. I’m truly sorry.”

 

LYNNWOOD, Wash. –  The sister of Lynnwood’s Kenneth Bae, who is imprisoned in North Korea, said Tuesday she was outraged by former NBA star Dennis Rodman’s comments in Pyongyang about her brother.  “This is not a game, this is a man’s life,” she said.

chung

Terri Chung of Lynnwood, sister of Kenneth Bae, who has been imprisoned in North Korea.

In an exclusive interview from North Korea Tuesday with CNN’s Chris Cuomo, Rodman defended his visit to North Korea with a team of fellow former NBA players in a combative exchange, saying the trip was a “great idea for the world.”  They are there to play a basketball game on Wednesday’s birthday of the North Korean dictator.

Cuomo

From CNN

Rodman reacted angrily when pressed on whether the group should have traveled there and whether he was planning to ask North Korean leaders about Bae, a U.S. citizen who was arrested in North Korea, convicted last spring by North Korea of “hostile acts” intended to topple the government and sentenced to 15 years in a labor camp.

In response, Rodman suggested the Korean-American had done something wrong, but did not specify what.

“Do you understand what he did in this country?” Rodman asked Cuomo.

“You tell me, what did he do?” Cuomo asked.

“No, no, no, you tell me, you tell me,” Rodman said. “Why is he held captive here in this country, why? … I would love to speak on this.”

Cuomo noted the North Korean government never released any charges and urged Rodman to speak out on what Bae allegedly did.  But Rodman evaded the question.

“You know,” Rodman said, “you’ve got 10 guys here, 10 guys here, that have left their families, they’ve left their damn families, to help this country in a sports venture. That’s 10 guys, all these guys here, do anyone understand that?”

“We do,” responded Cuomo. “And we appreciate that and we wish them well with cultural exchange.”

“No, no, no, no,” Rodman continued. “I don’t give a rat’s a– what the hell you think. I’m saying to you, look at these guys here, look at them … they dared to do one thing, they came here.”

Bae, a married father of three, has reportedly suffered a series of health problems during his detention.

Bae’s sister, Terri Chung, said in an interview with Q13 FOX News late Tuesday that Rodman’s remarks were outrageous.

“It’s one thing to play games with his own image, but this is not a game, this is a man’s life,” Chung said.

“He has refused to help, that’s his choice, but instead he has chosen to make these outrageous accusations that he clearly doesn’t know anything about,” she added.

She said her brother was in North Korea legally working as a tour operator. She hoped one of the former basketball players would take a chance to ask for amnesty for him.

“In Washington, White House spokesman Jay Carney noted that Rodman is on a private trip and that the United States has called for North Korea to release Bae.

“Our views about Kenneth Bae have not changed,” he said.

“I did not see some of the comments that Mr. Rodman made, but I am not going to dignify that outburst with a response,” Carney added. “I am simply going to say that we remain gravely concerned about Kenneth Bae’s health and continue to urge the DPRK authorities to grant his amnesty and immediate release on humanitarian grounds.”

To watch CNN’s full Dennis Rodman interview, click here.

Local News
01/07/14

Furious Rodman defends Kim Jung Un, rejects Q’s about Bae

WASHINGTON — Basketball star Dennis Rodman on Tuesday defended his controversial visit to North Korea with a team of former NBA players, saying it was a “great idea for the world.”

In an exclusive interview with Chris Cuomo of CNN’s “New Day” from the North Korean capital, Pyongyang, Rodman reacted angrily when pressed on whether the group should have traveled there given recent events in the secretive country.

Cuomo

From CNN

The trip takes place just weeks after North Korea shocked the world by announcing the purge and execution of Kim’s once-powerful uncle. There are also concerns for the welfare of U.S. citizen Kenneth Bae, who’s been detained there for more than a year.

The other former NBA players are due to take part in a controversial basketball game on the birthday of Kim Jong Un, the country’s young, unpredictable leader. The friendly contest with North Korea’s team is planned for Wednesday, when Kim is believed to turn 31.

Apparently referring to Kim, Rodman said, “I love my friend. This is my friend.”

Asked if he would take the opportunity to ask North Korean leaders about Bae, Rodman suggested the Korean-American had done something wrong but did not say what that was.

Growing angry with Cuomo and jabbing his finger toward the camera for emphasis, Rodman said, “Kenneth Bae did one thing … If you understand what Kenneth Bae did. Do you understand what he did in this country? No, no, no, you tell me, you tell me. Why is he held captive here in this country, why? … I would love to speak on this.

Rep. Rick Larsen, D-Wash., grew upset with Rodman’s comments, saying he should “Stick to basketball.”

“Kenneth Bae and his family have gone through mroe than enough without having to listen to these hurtful statements from somebody who clearly does not know what he is talking about,” Larsen said. Larsen is the Rep. from Kenneth Bae’s district.

To read more on this story and watch the full Dennis Rodman interview, click here.

(CNN) — Merrill Newman — the 85-year-old American from Palo Alto, Calif., detained by North Korean authorities more than a month ago — has been “deported,” North Korea’s state news agency KCNA reported early Saturday.

Newman held in N KoreaA senior Obama administration official said soon after the North Korean announcement that U.S. authorities have Newman “in hand in Beijing.”

State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf subsequently tweeted that U.S. Embassy officials met “Newman at the airport in Beijing and provided all appropriate consular assistance.”

As of about 6:55 p.m. (9:55 p.m. ET), Newman still hadn’t talked with his relatives in the United States, according to the family.

KCNA report stated that investigators determined that “Newman entered the DPRK with a wrong understanding of it and perpetrated a hostile act against it.”

“Taking into consideration his admittance of the act committed by him on the basis of his wrong understanding (and the) apology made by him for it, his sincere repentance of it and his advanced age and health condition, the above-said institution deported him from the country from a humanitarian viewpoint,” the official North Korean report added.

On Thursday, Harf said American officials had spoken the previous day with relatives of Newman and Kenneth Bae, another American (from Lynnwood, Wash.) being held in North Korea, but added little else.

Hours later, Harf issued a statement saying Washington was “pleased that Mr. Merrill Newman has been allowed to depart the DPRK and rejoin his family.”

“We welcome the DPRK’s decision to release him. This positive decision by the DPRK throws into sharper relief the continuing detention of … Bae,” she added. “… We call on the DPRK once again to pardon and grant Mr. Bae special amnesty and immediately release him as a humanitarian gesture so that he too can return home to his family.”

Coincidence or not, the news of Newman’s release came on the day that Vice President Joe Biden was in South Korea, where he was to lay a wreath at a memorial for veterans of the war that pitted North Korea against its southern neighbor as well as the United States.

Biden told reporters in South Korea that he “played no direct role” in the release. He added that his office offered to let Newman fly home with him on Air Force Two, but State Department officials said he’d take a direct commercial flight to San Francisco.

“It’s a positive thing they’ve done,” said the vice president, who talked Saturday morning by phone with Newman, according to another Obama administration official. “But they still have Mr. Bae, who has no reason being held in the North (and) should be released immediately.”

According to his family, Newman went on a 10-day organized private tour of North Korea in October. From phone calls and postcards he sent, the trip was going well and there was no indication of any kind of problem, son Jeff Newman said.

The day before he was to leave, “one or two Korean authorities” met with Newman and his tour guide, the son added. They talked about Newman’s service record, which left “my dad … a bit bothered,” according to Jeff Newman.

Then, just minutes before his Beijing-bound plane was set to depart Pyongyang in late October, he was taken off the aircraft by North Korean authorities.

For weeks, the Pyongyang government didn’t explain why they were holding Newman.

An explanation came a few days ago, when state media published and broadcast what they described as the Korean War veteran’s “apology.” In fact, that word — “apology” — was written atop the first of four handwritten pages detailing his alleged indiscretions.

In the note — which was dated Nov. 9 — Newman talked about his having advised the Kuwol Unit, part of the “intelligence bureau” fighting against Pyongyang during the Korean War. He detailed how he commanded troops to collect “information” and wage various deadly attacks.

“After I killed so many civilians and (North Korean) soldiers and destroyed strategic objects in the DPRK during the Korean War, I committed indelible offensive acts against the DPRK government and Korean people,” Newman said, according to that KCNA report.

The reported message also touched on his return 60 years later to North Korea, admitting that he “shamelessly … had a plan to meet any surviving soldiers and pray for the souls of the dead soldiers.”

His statement ended: “If I go back to (the) USA, I will tell the true features of the DPRK and the life the Korean people are leading.”

This public apology — which University of California-Berkeley professor Steve Weber characterized as “highly scripted political theater” — left some wondering what would happen to Newman.

Would he join Bae, an American arrested in North Korea in November 2012 who last May was sentenced to 15 years of hard labor after North Korea’s government found him guilty of “hostile acts” and attempts to topple the government? Or would he be released?

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