Story Summary

Boston Marathon explosions

At least two explosions occurred near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on April 15, killing at least three and injuring more than 170.

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(Facebook.com)

By Richard A. Serrano

Los Angeles Times

WASHINGTON–Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev allegedly shot and killed a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer Thursday because they wanted his service revolver, according to two federal government law enforcement officials who have been briefed on the Boston Marathon manhunt.

So far, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev faces federal charges for allegedly detonating a homemade bomb during the April 15 race. The Middlesex County district attorney is expected to file separate charges in the shooting of MIT officer Sean Collier. Mourners gathered Tuesday for Collier’s funeral in Stoneham, Mass.

The officials, speaking not for attribution because the case is continuing, said the Tsarnaevs fled in their car after seeing their images on the TV or Internet on Thursday night, and were eager to raise some quick cash and to better arm themselves.

They came upon Collier outside a gas station and convenience store near the MIT campus in Cambridge. He was apparently shot multiple times, but had left a safety device on his holster that the suspects could not unlock to retrieve the weapon.

It was unclear which brother shot the officer, the officials said. However, authorities have obtained a surveillance photo of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, dressed in a gray hoodie, at the store.

Later that night, the brothers carjacked a Mercedes SUV at gunpoint in Cambridge and forced the driver to give them $45, his bank card and PIN for an ATM machine. The driver, who has not been publicly identified, escaped after about 30 minutes and called police.

The sources described the driver as an immigrant with poor English and no Russian language skills. They said he did not understand much of what the carjackers said during the ordeal, although he told the FBI one of the men said, “Did you hear about the Boston explosion? I did that.”

MortarBOSTON — One of the suspected Boston Marathon bombers purchased two large reloadable mortar kits from a fireworks store in New Hampshire, an executive with the pyrotechnics company said Tuesday.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev paid $199 cash for two “lock and load” kits, each of which contained four tubes and 24 shells, said William Weimer, vice president of Phantom Fireworks. Such kits cannot be legally sold in some states, including Massachusetts and California.

The kits are typically used for amateur fireworks displays. Users load one shell at a time into a launch tube, and when it is shot in the air, the shell bursts, creating a colorful and noisy light display, Weimer said.

Each shell is loaded with two forms of powder, he said: a black powder, which is the explosive ingredient that causes the shell to burst, and effect powder, which creates the colors and noise.

“The only thing that he could have done is he could have ripped all the shells apart and attempted to harvest the powder,” he said.

Tsarnaev could have collected 1.5 pounds of powder at most, a tiny fraction of the amount he could have legally purchased elsewhere, Weimer said.

For more on this LA Times story, click here.

 

Infrared image of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev hiding in a boat in Watertown, Mass.

Infrared image of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev hiding in a boat in Watertown, Mass.

The Huffington Post reported that Dave Henneberry, the man who tipped off police to Dzhokhar Tsarnaev hiding in his boat, is receiving donations from well-intentioned citizens who want see him as a hero for aiding authorities in capturing Tasarnaev.

Henneberry, of Watertown, tipped off police as to Tasarnaev’s whereabout after they had been searching five days for him. During the capture of Tasarnaev, Henneberry’s boat was severely damaged.

“That boat’s his baby. He takes care of it like you wouldn’t believe. And they told him it’s all shot up,” Henneberry’s friend and neighbor George Pizzuto told ABC News. “He’s going to be heartbroken.”

An online fundraising site has been formed to help get Henneberry that new boat, Crowdtilt, which has raised more than $10,000, and there’s a Facebook page honoring Henneberry’s role in Tasarnaev’s capture.

 (CNN) — The surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings has indicated that his older brother, not any international terrorist group, masterminded the deadly attack, a U.S. government source said.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who has been hospitalized with a tube down his throat since Friday, communicated with investigators by writing and nodding.

The preliminary interviews with Tsarnaev suggest the two brothers fit the classification of self-radicalized jihadists, the government source said.

Tsarnaev has conveyed to investigators that Tamerlan’s motivation stemmed from jihadist thought and the idea that Islam is under attack, and jihadists need to fight back, the source said Monday.

The government source cautioned that the interviews were preliminary, and that Tsarnaev’s account needs to be checked out and followed up on by investigators.

bombing suspect1

Photo released by FBI

A federal law enforcement official told CNN that while investigators have seen no indication the suspects collaborated with others, they still have plenty of work to do before they can confidently say no one else was involved in the April 15 attack that killed three people and wounded more than 260 others. That official would not comment on any motive or specifics on what Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has communicated to officials.

Clues to Tamerlan’s trip to Russia

A bedside court appearance

The younger Tsarnaev has been charged with using and conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction resulting in death, as well as one count of malicious destruction of property by means of an explosive device resulting in death.

The 19-year-old was shot in the head, neck, legs and one hand, according to an FBI affidavit supporting the charges. It’s not clear whether he was wounded during his capture Friday night or in an earlier shootout with police that left his 26-year-old brother dead.

Though he had been heavily sedated and on a ventilator at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Tsarnaev was “alert, mentally competent and lucid” during the brief initial court appearance at his bedside Monday, U.S. Magistrate Judge Marianne Bowler found.

Read a transcript of the hearing

During the hearing, Tsarnaev communicated mostly by nodding his head, though he once answered “no” when Bowler asked him if he could afford a lawyer, according to a transcript of the proceeding. A public defender was appointed to represent him.

Investigators have been asking Tsarnaev whether there are more bombs, explosives caches or weapons beyond those already found by police, and if anyone else was involved in the attacks, a source with direct knowledge of the investigation told CNN. Investigators are going into Tsarnaev’s room every few hours to ask questions in the presence of doctors, the source said.

Federal agents at first questioned Tsarnaev without reading him his Miranda rights, under an exception to the rule invoked when authorities believe there is an imminent public safety threat, a Justice Department official said over the weekend. But by the time of the hospital room proceeding, government sources said he had been read his rights, and Bowler reviewed those with him again Monday.

Bowler scheduled a probable cause hearing May 30.

Read the charges

Did the brothers have more plans?

Newly released surveillance images show a stone-faced Dzhokhar Tsarnaev visiting an ATM in the hours before a police chase and chaotic shootout in which more than 200 rounds were fired.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev died at a hospital after that shootout with police early Friday.

A bloody Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was found Friday night, hiding in a boat in the backyard of a house in the Boston suburb of Watertown.

Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said the brothers, armed with handguns and explosives, apparently were planning another attack before the shootout derailed their efforts.

“I believe that the only reason that someone would have those in their possession was to further attack people and cause more death and destruction,” Davis told CNN on Monday.

Dead suspect’s wife ‘very distraught’

Tracing Tamerlan Tsarnaev’s background

While Tamerlan Tsarnaev apparently became increasingly radical in the past three or four years, there was no evidence Monday that he had any active association with international jihadist groups.

The Tsarnaev family is from the Russian republic of Chechnya and fled the brutal wars there in the 1990s. The two brothers were born in Kyrgyzstan; Dzhokhar became a U.S. citizen in 2012, while Tamerlan was a legal U.S. resident.

An FBI official said agents interviewed Tamerlan Tsarnaev in 2011 at the request of the Russian government. The FBI said Russia claimed that he was a follower of radical Islam and that he had changed drastically since 2010.

But the Russian government’s request was vague, a U.S. official and a law enforcement source said Sunday. The lack of specifics limited how much the FBI was able to investigate Tamerlan, the law enforcement official said.

Dead Boston bomb suspect posted video of jihadist, analysis show

Suspects’ mother reacts

The suspects’ mother, Zubeidat Tsarnaev, said Tuesday that she believed her sons had been framed.

Speaking from her home in Dagestan — a Russian republic on the Caspian Sea — Tsarnaev said she didn’t believe her older son was dead until she saw images of his body Monday night on the Internet.

Tsarnaev said she believes a conspiracy is at work against her sons, and she doesn’t believe evidence put forward by U.S. investigators in alleging their involvement in the bomb plot.

She thinks he died because he was a Muslim and charged that authorities silenced her younger son to prevent him from defending himself.

She said family members have arranged for Tamerlan Tsarnaev to be buried at a mosque in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Tuesday or Wednesday.

Officer’s funeral

University police Officer Sean Collier, allegedly slain by the Tsarnaev brothers Thursday night, will be buried Tuesday in a private funeral in Stoneham, Massachusetts, CNN affiliate WHDH reported.

Collier was found dead in his patrol car on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus Thursday night. Authorities believe the brothers shot him to death before stealing a car and leading police on a wild chase in which they fired handguns and hurled explosives at pursuing officers.

A public memorial service is scheduled for Wednesday on MIT’s campus, WHDH reported.

Area near blasts to reopen Tuesday

Eight days after the dual bombing turned a stretch of Boylston Street into a gruesome scene of carnage, Boston is now ready to open the area to business owners and residents.

While the site will remain closed to the general public, authorities will escort business owners and residents to the area over several hours Tuesday, the city’s website states.

When Bostonians eventually return to Boylston Street en masse, the sight will send a strong message about the city’s strength, the police chief said.

“They will be walking up and down this street, and the terrorists will understand that they can not keep us down.”

–Jake Tapper and Matt Smith, CNN. CNN’s Holly Yan, Michael Pearson, Carol Cratty, Tina Burnside, Fran Townsend, Deborah Feyerick, Jill Dougherty, Nick Paton Walsh, Pamela Brown, Julian Cummings, Barbara Starr and Susan Candiotti contributed to this report.

BOSTON – A federal magistrate, prosecutor and public defender held an extraordinary court session Monday in the hospital room of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, providing the first glimpse of the accused Boston Marathon bomber since his arrest on Friday.

Before Tsarnaev was formally charged, two sources familiar with the investigation said officials were able to ask him several questions, and that although he could barely speak, he was cooperative. One official with knowledge of the investigation said Tsarnaev acknowledged that he and his brother were motivated by jihadist ideology.

Authorities are still investigating whether the two men had ties to any radical Islamic groups.

The bedside hearing, according to an official transcript by a court reporter, began with Dr. Stephen R. Odom, a trauma surgeon, making sure that Tsarnaev was well enough for the hearing.

“How are you feeling?” he asked him. “Are you able to answer some questions?”

An Inside Look At Bombing SuspectsTsarnaev nodded yes.

The magistrate began by asking William Fick, an assistant public defender, whether “you have had an opportunity to speak with him?”

“Very briefly, your honor,” Fick said.

Turning to Tsarnaev, the magistrate said, “So you have your lawyers here.”

Tsarnaev nodded yes.

U.S. Magistrate Marianne B. Bowler advised him of his legal rights and read the criminal charges against him, according to notes in the court case file.

He is accused of one count of using and conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction and one count of malicious destruction of property by means of an explosive device resulting in death.

Federal prosecutors warned Tsarnaev that he could face the death penalty if convicted. They asked the magistrate that he be kept in custody.

At that point, Tsarnaev agreed to an order of voluntary detention and declined to answer questions on whether he was suitable for release on bail, according to the notes from the court clerk.

William Weinreb, an assistant federal prosecutor, advised Tsarnaev that the punishment upon conviction on each of the two counts could be “death, or imprisonment for any term of years, or life” and “a fine of up to $250,000.”

The magistrate told Tsarnaev: “This is not a trial, and you will not be called upon to answer the charges at this time. If at any time I say something you do not understand, interrupt me and say so; is that clear?”

Tsarnaev nodded yes.

“All right,” she said. “I note that the defendant has nodded affirmatively.”

She told him he had the right not to incriminate himself, and did not have to speak to or cooperate with the government. “Do you understand everything I have said about your right to remain silent?”

Again he nodded yes, and she said, “Again I note that the defendant has nodded affirmatively.”

She then asked him whether he could afford an attorney.

It was the only time that Tsarnaev, who was shot in the neck, made any sound. “No,” he said.

The magistrate said, “Let the record reflect that I believe the defendant has said ‘No.’ “

She added: “I find that the defendant is alert, mentally competent and lucid. He is aware of the nature of the proceedings.”

She set another hearing in Boston for May 30.

For more on this LA Times story, click here.

BOSTON — A woman who lost a foot in the Boston Marathon bombings is an Issaquah native and her friends are working to help her cover medical bills.

The website Fund for Adrianne was set up by the owners of the dance studio in Boston where she teaches.  As of 8:37 p.m. PT Monday, the website had raised $108,314; its goal is $250,000.

Adrianne Haslet-Davis, who graduated from Issaquah High, is a professional dancer who now lives in Boston. She was right in front of the second bomb when it went off. The blast took off most of her left foot. It also broke several bones in her husband’s foot.

He used his belt as a tourniquet  to stop his wife’s bleeding.

adrianneAt first, she didn’t think she’d survive.

“I remember everything. I remember the first bomb going off and holding on to Adam, my husband, and thinking, ‘Oh my gosh, there’s never just one’ and I just knew that something was about to happen and I started screaming, ‘Oh no. Oh no.’ Then the second bomb went off and it went off directly in front of us.”

Doctors had to amputate her foot. She’s angry about what happened, but says she’s moving forward, to the next chapter in her life. With help from a prosthetic, she hopes to dance again one day — and even run in next year’s Boston Marathon.

(CNN) — The surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings has been charged, the Justice Department announced Monday.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was charged with one count of using and conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction resulting in death and one count of malicious destruction of property by means of an explosive device resulting in death, according to a statement from the Justice Department.

He could face the death penalty if convicted.

Tsarnaev, 19, made his initial appearance Monday before Magistrate Judge Marianne B. Bowler in his hospital room at Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital in Boston.

The decision to charge Tsarnaev in civilian court put an end to speculation that he would be charged as an enemy combatant, a designation sometimes used against terrorists.

White House spokesman Jay Carney said the decision not to treat Tsarnaev as an enemy combatant is “absolutely the right way to go and the appropriate way to go.”

Carney said that because Tsarnaev is a naturalized U.S. citizen, he cannot be tried by a military commission.

bombing suspect1

Photo released by FBI

“And it is important to remember that since 9/11 we have used the federal court system to convict and incarcerate hundreds of terrorists,” Carney said.

Despite being seriously wounded and heavily sedated, Tsarnaev is answering brief questions from his hospital bed by nodding his head, a source with first-hand knowledge of the investigation told CNN Monday.

Authorities are asking the 19-year-old if there are more bombs, explosives caches or weapons, and if anyone else was involved, the source said.

Investigators are going into Tsarnaev’s room every few hours to ask questions in the presence of doctors, the source said.

It wasn’t immediately clear what he may be communicating.

Tsarnaev, who is on a ventilator and restrained, has been hospitalized since authorities took him into custody Friday night after finding him hiding in a boat in the back yard of a Watertown, Massachusetts, home.

His injuries include a wound to the lower half of his body and a neck wound, the source said. It wasn’t clear when he received the neck wound.

Tsarnaev had also lost a lot of blood and may have hearing loss from two flash-bang devices used to draw him out of the boat, the source said.

Investigators believe Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and his brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, were behind the attacks that killed three people and wounded more than 170 others a week ago Monday.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, died early Friday at a hospital after a shootout with police.

The developments came the same day as memorial services for two people killed in the bombings and a planned moment of silence to honor victims.

Elder suspect’s wife

With one suspect dead and the other hindered in his ability to communicate, investigators are eager to speak to Tamerlan Tsarnaev’s wife, Katherine Russell, to see what she might know about incidents leading up to the bombings.

On Monday, her attorney said she learned of her husband’s alleged involvement through news accounts.

“She knew nothing about it at any time,” Amato DeLuca said in response to questions about whether Russell knew of plans to attack the marathon.

Tsarnaev stayed home and cared for the couple’s 2-year-old daughter while his wife worked long hours as a home care aide, according to DeLuca.

The family is devastated, the attorney said.

“They’re very distraught. They’re upset. Their lives have been unalterably changed. They’re upset because of what happened, the people that were injured, that were killed. It’s an awful, terrible thing,” he said. “And of course Katy, it’s even worse because what she lost — her husband and the father of her daughter.”

Police chief: The carnage could have been worse

In the tumultuous days after the bombings, the Tsarnaev brothers allegedly killed a university police officer, led authorities on a harrowing chase and hurled explosives at police, authorities said. Another officer, seriously wounded in a firefight with the suspects, was recovering Monday, Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said.

The brothers – armed with handguns and explosives — apparently were planning another attack before a shootout with police disrupted their efforts, Davis said.

“I believe that the only reason that someone would have those in their possession was to further attack people and cause more death and destruction,” Davis said on CNN’s “Starting Point” Monday.

Authorities believe the brothers bought bomb components locally but think that their guns came from elsewhere, another federal law enforcement official said. The official, who was not authorized to publicly discuss the case, said authorities are trying to trace the guns.

Investigators are also trying to determine whether anyone else was involved in the bombings.

But Davis, speaking Sunday to CNN’s Don Lemon, said that he was confident that the brothers were “the two major actors in the violence that occurred.”

“I told the people of Boston that they can rest easily, that the two people who were committing these vicious attacks are either dead or arrested, and I still believe that,” the police chief said.

Details on shootout

The wild shootout that prompted the dramatic lockdown of the Boston area Friday began after a single officer gave chase after encountering the stolen car the brothers allegedly were driving, Watertown police Chief Edward Deveau told CNN’s Wolf Blizter on Saturday.

According to Deveau, the brothers stepped out of the car and shot at the officer, who put his car in reverse to get away from the gunfire.

More officers arrived, sparking a firefight that lasted five to 10 minutes. More than 200 shots were fired, and one of the brothers threw explosives at police — including a pressure cooker bomb similar to the one used at the marathon, Deveau said.

Eventually, Tamerlan Tsarnaev emerged from cover and began walking toward officers, firing as he went, the chief said.

When he ran out of ammunition, officers tackled him and tried to handcuff him, Deveau said Saturday.

But then, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev came barreling at them in the stolen vehicle, the chief said. The officers scrambled out of the way, and the vehicle then ran over the older brother and dragged him for a short distance.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev also had explosives on his body, officials have said.

Clues about radicalization?

While investigators piece together the brothers’ actions leading up to the marathon bombings, details have emerged suggesting the elder Tsarnaev was turning radical.

The Tsarnaev family hails from the Russian republic of Chechnya and fled the brutal wars there in the 1990s. The two brothers were born in Kyrgyzstan, authorities said.

An FBI official said agents interviewed Tamerlan Tsarnaev in 2011 at the request of the Russian government. The FBI said Russia claimed that he was a follower of radical Islam and that he had changed drastically since 2010.

But the Russian government’s request was vague, a U.S. official and a law enforcement source said Sunday. The lack of specifics limited how much the FBI was able to investigate Tamerlan, the law enforcement official said.

Dead Boston bomb suspect posted video of jihadist, analysis shows

Tamerlan Tsarnaev apparently became increasingly radical in the past three or four years, according to an analysis of his social media accounts and the recollections of family members. But so far, there has been no evidence of active association with international jihadist groups.

In August 2012, soon after returning from a visit to Russia, the elder Tsarnaev brother created a YouTube channel with links to a number of videos. Two videos under a category labeled “Terrorists” were deleted. It’s not clear when or by whom.

In January, Tamerlan Tsarnaev disrupted a service at the Islamic Society of Boston’s mosque in Cambridge, Massachusets, a board member told CNN’s Brian Todd.

Tsarnaev was reacting to a speaker who likened the Muslim Prophet Mohammed to Martin Luther King Jr., the board member said. He calmed after worshippers spoke with him, and returned often for pre-dawn prayers on Fridays, the board member said.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev also sometimes attended prayers — but only with his brother, the board member said.

Opinion: Don’t blame immigration for bombings

Memorials and tributes

Boston officials planned a moment of silence for 2:50 p.m. Monday to mark the passing of one week since the bombings. A minute later, bells will toll to honor the victims.

One of those victims, Krystle Campbell was memorialized Monday morning in a service at St. Joseph Catholic Church in Medford, Massachusetts.

After the service, police officers lined the street in front of the church as other officers wearing dress uniforms saluted as the casket bearing her remains was taken from the church and loaded into a hearse.

Another memorial service was scheduled Monday night for victim Lingzi Lu, a student from China.

Also on Monday, runners in at least 80 cities will participate in the “Run for Boston in Your City” campaign, organizer Brian Kelley said. The global campaign is “a run for those that were unable to finish, a run for those that may never run again” and “a run for us to try and make sense of the tragedy that has forever changed something we love,” according to organizers.

Moving forward

A week after the marathon bombings, 50 people remain hospitalized, including two in critical condition, according to a CNN tally.

At least a dozen survivors have endured amputations.

Patients at Massachusetts General Hospital have received visits from war veterans who have also suffered amputations. The vets, Dr. Jeffrey Kalish said, told patients that their lives aren’t over because they’ve lost limbs.

“We’ve seen really tremendous success and great attitudes,” he said.

Also Monday, Davis — the Boston police commissioner — said transit system police officer Richard Donohue, wounded in the firefight with the Tsarnaev brothers, was improving.

“He was in grave condition when he went to the hospital, so we’re very optimistic at this point in time, and our prayers are with him and his family,” he said.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, meanwhile, remains in serious but stable condition, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office District of Massachusetts. A federal law enforcement source with knowledge of the investigation told CNN the younger brother has a gunshot wound to his neck, and he had a tube down his throat to help him breathe.

It’s unclear whether Tsarnaev was wounded during his capture or in the earlier shootout with police that left his older brother dead, said the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

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Getting back to normal

It could take up to two more days before the area around the site of the explosions can reopen to the public, Davis said.

The FBI has not yet turned the scene back over to local authorities, the police chief said.

“We have to allow store owners to go in there first. It won’t be open to the general public for maybe another day so the store owners can get their business back on track,” Davis said. “We want to get people back in their homes as soon as possible, and we’re working diligently on that right now.”

–Micheal Pearson and Holly Yan, CNN. CNN’s Gloria Borger, Fran Townsend, Tim Lister, Paul Cruickshank, Deborah Feyerick, Jill Dougherty, Pamela Brown, Julian Cummings, Barbara Starr, Susan Candiotti and Jake Tapper contributed to this report.

bombing suspect yearbook cropWASHINGTON — The White House said Monday that the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing will not be treated as an enemy combatant, in response to calls from Republican lawmakers to consider that option.White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said U.S. citizens — like suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev — cannot be tried in military commissions and stressed that the civilian court system can handle such a case.

–FoxNews.com

 

 

(CNN) — Despite being seriously wounded and heavily sedated, the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings is answering brief questions from authorities by nodding his head, a source with first-hand knowledge of the investigation told CNN Monday.

Authorities are asking Dzhokhar Tsarnaev whether there are more bombs, explosives caches or weapons, and whether anyone was helping him and his brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the source said.

Investigators are going into Tsarnaev’s room at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston every few hours to ask questions in the presence of doctors, the source said.

It wasn’t immediately clear what information he may be communicating to investigators.

bombing suspect1

Photo released by FBI

Tsarnaev, who is on a ventilator and restrained, has been hospitalized since authorities took him into custody Friday night after finding him hiding in a boat in the back yard of a Watertown, Massachusetts, home.

While Tsarnaev, 19, has not yet been charged with a crime, investigators believe he and his brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, were behind the attacks that killed three people and wounded more than 170 others.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, died early Friday at a hospital after a shootout with police.

While authorities say Bostonians can rest easier now that the two suspects are accounted for, nagging questions hinder any total sense of security: Why would the assailants want to kill or maim throngs of innocent civilians, and could this happen again?

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick and Boston Mayor Thomas Menino have asked Bostonians and residents in the rest of the state to observe a moment of silence at 2:50 p.m. Monday, exactly a week after the twin explosions near the marathon’s finish line. Bells will toll one minute later to honor the victims of the tragedy that traumatized the city.

Also Monday, memorial services are scheduled for bombing victims Krystle Campbell and Lingzi Lu.

Elder suspect’s wife

With one suspect dead and the other hindered in his ability to communicate, investigators are eager to speak to Tamerlan Tsarnaev’s wife, Katherine Russell, to see what she might know about incidents leading up to the bombings.

On Monday, her attorney said she learned of her husband’s alleged involvement through news accounts.

“She knew nothing about it at any time,” Amato DeLuca said in response to questions about whether Russell knew of plans to attack the marathon.

Tsarnaev stayed home and cared for the couple’s 2-year-old daughter while his wife worked long hours as a home care aide, according to DeLuca.

The family is devastated, the attorney said.

“They’re very distraught. They’re upset. Their lives have been unalterably changed. They’re upset because of what happened, the people that were injured, that were killed. It’s an awful, terrible thing,” he said. “And of course Katy, it’s even worse because what she lost — her husband and the father of her daughter.”

Police chief: The carnage could have been worse

In the tumultuous days after the bombings, the Tsarnaev brothers allegedly killed a university police officer, led authorities on a harrowing chase and hurled explosives at police, authorities said. Another officer, seriously wounded in a firefight with the suspects, was recovering Monday, Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said.

Police say they believe the brothers were planning another attack before a shootout with police disrupted their plans, Davis said.

“The two suspects were armed with handguns at the scene of the shootout, and there were multiple explosive devices, including a large one that was similar to the pressure cooker device that was found on Boylston Street,” Davis said on CNN’s “Starting Point” Monday.

“I believe that the only reason that someone would have those in their possession was to further attack people and cause more death and destruction,” he said.

Authorities believe the brothers bought bomb components locally but think that their guns came from elsewhere, another federal law enforcement official said. The official, who was not authorized to publicly discuss the case, said authorities are trying to trace the guns.

Investigators are also trying to determine whether anyone else was involved in the bombings.

But Davis, speaking Sunday to CNN’s Don Lemon, said that he was confident that the brothers were “the two major actors in the violence that occurred.”

“I told the people of Boston that they can rest easily, that the two people who were committing these vicious attacks are either dead or arrested, and I still believe that,” the police chief said.

Details on shootout

The wild shootout that prompted the dramatic lockdown of the Boston area Friday began after a single officer gave chase after encountering the stolen car the brothers allegedly were driving, Watertown police Chief Edward Deveau told CNN’s Wolf Blizter on Saturday.

According to Deveau, the brothers stepped out of the car and shot at the officer, who put his car in reverse to get away from the gunfire.

More officers arrived, sparking a firefight that lasted five to 10 minutes. More than 200 shots were fired, and one of the brothers threw explosives at police — including a pressure cooker bomb similar to the one used at the marathon, Deveau said.

Eventually, Tamerlan Tsarnaev emerged from cover and began walking toward officers, firing as he went, the chief said.

When he ran out of ammunition, officers tackled him and tried to handcuff him, Deveau said Saturday.

But then, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev came barreling at them in the stolen vehicle, the chief said. The officers scrambled out of the way, and the vehicle then ran over the older brother and dragged him for a short distance.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev also had explosives on his body, officials have said.

Clues about radicalization?

While investigators piece together the brothers’ actions leading up to the marathon bombings, details have emerged suggesting the elder Tsarnaev was turning radical.

The Tsarnaev family hails from the Russian republic of Chechnya and fled the brutal wars there in the 1990s. The two brothers were born in Kyrgyzstan, authorities said.

An FBI official said agents interviewed Tamerlan Tsarnaev in 2011 at the request of the Russian government. The FBI said Russia claimed that he was a follower of radical Islam and that he had changed drastically since 2010.

But the Russian government’s request was vague, a U.S. official and a law enforcement source said Sunday. The lack of specifics limited how much the FBI was able to investigate Tamerlan, the law enforcement official said.

 

Dead Boston bomb suspect posted video of jihadist, analysis shows

Tamerlan Tsarnaev apparently became increasingly radical in the past three or four years, according to an analysis of his social media accounts and the recollections of family members. But so far, there has been no evidence of active association with international jihadist groups.

In August 2012, soon after returning from a visit to Russia, the elder Tsarnaev brother created a YouTube channel with links to a number of videos. Two videos under a category labeled “Terrorists” were deleted. It’s not clear when or by whom.

According to The Boston Globe, Tamerlan Tsarnaev disrupted a service a Cambridge mosque in January after a speaker likened the Muslim Prophet Mohammed to Martin Luther King Jr. The congregation “shouted him out of the mosque,” the Globe quoted mosque spokesman Yusufi Vali as saying.

Opinion: Don’t blame immigration for bombings

Moving forward

A week after the marathon bombings, 55 people remain hospitalized, including three in critical condition, according to a CNN tally.

At least a dozen survivors have endured amputations.

The transit system officer wounded in the firefight with the Tsarnaev brothers, Richard Donohue, was improving Monday, Davis said.

“He was in grave condition when he went to the hospital, so we’re very optimistic at this point in time, and our prayers are with him and his family,” he said.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, meanwhile, remains in serious but stable condition, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office District of Massachusetts. A federal law enforcement source with knowledge of the investigation told CNN the younger brother has a gunshot wound to his neck, and he had a tube down his throat to help him breathe.

It’s unclear whether Tsarnaev was wounded during his capture or in the earlier shootout with police that left his older brother dead, said the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

Tsarnaev had not been charged as of Monday morning.

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Authorities have not publicly stated what charges will be filed, but a Justice Department official who has been briefed on the case told CNN Tsarnaev will face federal terrorism charges and possibly state murder charges.

While Massachusetts does not have a death penalty, prosecutors could seek the death penalty at the federal level.

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Getting back to normal

It could take up to two more days before the area around the site of the explosions can reopen to the public, Davis said.

The FBI has not yet turned the scene back over to local authorities, the police chief said.

“We have to allow store owners to go in there first. It won’t be open to the general public for maybe another day so the store owners can get their business back on track,” Davis said. “We want to get people back in their homes as soon as possible, and we’re working diligently on that right now.”

Also on Monday, the one-week anniversary of the Boston attacks, thousands of runners across the country will pound the pavement in a show of unity and support for the victims and their families.

At least 80 cities are participating in a “Run for Boston in Your City” campaign called #BostonStrong, organizer Brian Kelley said.

The global campaign is “a run for those that were unable to finish, a run for those that may never run again” and “a run for us to try and make sense of the tragedy that has forever changed something we love.”

–Holly Yan and Chelsea J. Carter, CNN. CNN’s Gloria Borger, Fran Townsend, Tim Lister, Paul Cruickshank, Deborah Feyerick, Jill Dougherty, Pamela Brown, Julian Cummings, Barbara Starr, Susan Candiotti and Jake Tapper contributed to this report.

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