Story Summary

Latest 2013 Election Results

ElectionAbove are the latest stories on the different elections occurring around Washington state on Nov. 5. Below are some of the latest numbers from the biggest local and state races as posted at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday night.

I-517: Initiatives and Referendum Process 

No — 691,220 votes, 61.1%

Yes — 440,589 votes, 38.9%

I-522: Labeling of Genetically Engineered Food 

No — 632,869 votes, 54.1%

Yes — 537,973 votes, 45.9%

Seattle Mayor 

Ed Murray — 64,177 votes, 55.3%

Mike McGinn — 50,966 votes, 44 %

SeaTac Proposition 1: $15 minimum wage 

Yes — 2,089 votes, 53.0%

No — 1,853 votes, 47.0%

Seattle Council Districts 

Yes — 69,621 votes, 64.8%

No — 37,831 votes, 35.2%

Seattle Council, Position 2 

Richard Conlin — 55,543 votes, 52.8%

Kshama Sawant — 49,363 votes, 46.9%

Legislative District 26, State Senator

Jan Angel R– 17,548 votes, 51.8%

Nathan Schlicher D — 16,311 votes, 48.2%

 

 

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Politics
11/07/13

Latest 2013 Election Results

ElectionAbove are the latest stories on the different elections occurring around Washington state on Nov. 5. Below are some of the latest numbers from the biggest local and state races as posted at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday night.

I-517: Initiatives and Referendum Process 

No — 691,220 votes, 61.1%

Yes — 440,589 votes, 38.9%

I-522: Labeling of Genetically Engineered Food 

No — 632,869 votes, 54.1%

Yes — 537,973 votes, 45.9%

Seattle Mayor 

Ed Murray — 64,177 votes, 55.3%

Mike McGinn — 50,966 votes, 44 %

SeaTac Proposition 1: $15 minimum wage 

Yes — 2,089 votes, 53.0%

No — 1,853 votes, 47.0%

Seattle Council Districts 

Yes — 69,621 votes, 64.8%

No — 37,831 votes, 35.2%

Seattle Council, Position 2 

Richard Conlin — 55,543 votes, 52.8%

Kshama Sawant — 49,363 votes, 46.9%

Legislative District 26, State Senator

Jan Angel R– 17,548 votes, 51.8%

Nathan Schlicher D — 16,311 votes, 48.2%

kshamaSEATTLE — There seems to be no love lost between the two candidates fighting for Seattle City Council Position 2.

Tuesday’s initial ballot count in the race between Kshama Sawant and 16-year incumbent Richard Conlin showed Conlin leading in the race by a 7.2 percent margin.

Conlin told the Seattle Times that his initial lead was insurmountable.

In the early morning hours post-Election Day, the Twitter account associated with Sawant’s campaign tweeted at Conlin, “…you are the big loser of the night. You can collect your paycheck for 2 years and then… Goodbye.” The tweet ended with the hashtag, “Conlin-is-Gonelin.”

The tweet was later deleted, but not before the Seattle Times captured this screen grab.

As of Wednesday evening, Conlin was leading with 53.03 percent of the vote to Sawant’s 46.71 percent.

Sawant’s campaign vowed to challenge Conlin when he’s likely up for re-election in 2015.

SEATTLE — By 54-46%, Washington state’s voters were soundly rejecting Initiative 522, which would require labels on products containing genetically modified organisms, the latest election results showed Wednesday afternoon.
i-522The hotly contentious issue might have spurred the most expensive political campaign in the state’s history – it’s been reported that more than $30 million has been spent and most of it came from out-of-state donors.
On Wednesday afternoon, with more than 1 million votes counted, the measure was being rejected 54-46% statewide, with only King, Whatcom, San Juan and Jefferson counties supporting the proposal. I-522 saw its largest defeat in the state’s smallest county. Garfield County voted 82 percent against the measure, a clear message from a community where two-thirds of the land is occupied by farms.

Pro-Initiative 522 campaign manager Delana Jones refused to concede after initial results were released, pointing out there are thousands of ballots still to be counted.

See the county-by-county breakdown of votes on Initiative 522 here.

SEATAC — Workers are optmistic that the SeaTac “Good Jobs Initiative” will pass after jumping out to an early lead in the election. And with the latest ballot count on Wednesday night, with 3,942 votes counted, that optimism reigns with a tally of 53% to 47% supporting the initiative.

The initiative seeks to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour for workers in Seattle-Tacoma International Airport and at airport-related businesses.

“It was a warm feeling. Man, I don’t know how else (to say it). It’s a feeling  I didn’t think was going to happen,” Dontreale Cain said.

Cain is still celebrating what he believes will be a victory in the vote to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. He said he’s watched hospitality and transportation workers around SeaTac struggle for years to make ends meet.

“If you have kids at home and you’re sick, or if you have to work multiple jobs, you have no time for your family — you have no time for anybody,” he said.

“It’s sending an incredible message, which is we are tired of waiting for Congress tired of waiting for corporations to deal with massive income inequality in our country,” Heather Weiner, a spokesperson for the Yes! For SeaTac campaign, said.

Organizers expect their message to spread beyond SeaTac workers. This summer in Seattle, fast food workers also rallied to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour and both Mayor Mike McGinn and Ed Murray supported the idea, and we’re told the city council may take up the issue as soon as this week.

“I think Seattle is going to look at it seriously,” Weiner said. “And they`ll probably try to phase it in.”

“My biggest fear is for the employees in all the related industries,” Scott Ostrander, who opposes the proposition, said.

Ostrander runs the Cedarbrook Lodge near SeaTac and said that if the proposition passes, it could ultimately hurt workers as companies search for ways to make up for the added costs.

“There’s been talks of complete restructuring, raising of rates or fees for services… possibly elimination of services, a reduction in employee hours and downsizing staff which would include lay-offs,” he said.

“We’ve also heard that in other cities where they raised the wages,” Weiner said. “We’ve heard the sky is falling. In fact, we’ve seen the opposite happen — businesses end up saving money because they have lower turnover rates, businesses end up having greater productivity, morale is higher and they’re getting better employees because of the higher wages.”

Opponents of the proposition are optimistic they can win, since not all of the ballots have been counted. Of 12,108 mailed to voters, 3,942 were counted by 8:30 p.m. Wednesday. Ballots will continued to be counted and then verified on Nov. 26.

Opponents said if they do lose, they won’t rule out a challenge and the issue could end up in a courtroom.

You can track the ballot count on the proposition and other King County elections here. State election results are available here and county results can be found here.

seatac worker

Politics
11/06/13

McGinn concedes to Murray

SEATTLE — State Sen. Ed Murray, D-Seattle, maintained a seemingly insurmountable double-digit lead over incumbent Mike McGinn in the Seattle’s mayoral race, new election results showed Wednesday night. By Thursday morning, Mayor Mike McGinn acknowledged that he would not be able to come back and conceded the race to Murray.

Mayor-elect Ed Murray talks his planThe second day of vote-counting by the King County Elections Department showed Murray with a 55-44% lead over McGinn — 64,177 votes to McGinn’s 50,966 votes.

McGinn scheduled a news conference for 10:30 a.m. Thursday to likely concede the race.

McGinn, who was elected as the city’s 52nd mayor in November 2009, found himself in the position of underdog in this race.  He was dogged by criticism that he was a somewhat thorny mayor — willing to go to the mat for issues he vehemently supports — and he’s faced criticism concerning downtown safety and the police department’s use of excessive force that brought the Department of Justice to town to try to rectify the situation.

Murray, 58, was first appointed to fill a vacant 43rd District seat in the state House of Representatives in October 1995 and was re-elected  every two years until he decided in 2006 to run for the state Senate seat then held by Sen. Pat Thibaudeau, who eventually dropped out of the race and gave Murray a clear path to the state Senate.

In his first session in the Senate, 2007-08, Murray was appointed vice chairman of the majority caucus and in the 2009–10 session, he served as chairman of the majority caucus. After having been re-elected unopposed in 2010, Murray was appointed chairman of the powerful Ways and Means Committee for 2011–12.

Murray, a married gay man, has also been very active in advancing LGBT rights. He led the push for an anti-discrimination law protecting gays and lesbians, a measure that finally passed in 2006 after three decades of debate. He was also the main sponsor of legislation creating domestic partnerships, approved in 2007, and then the law legalizing gay marriage in the state in 2012.

In February 2013, Murray was a sponsor of an assault weapons ban bill, SB 5737, which did not pass.

For a list of the candidates and issues on the ballot, go the King County website. After that you can see King County results here, county results here and statewide results here.

Guests
11/06/13

GUEST: Election wrap up with Prof. David Domke

desmoines

A candidate who died in August won a seat on the water district commission in Des Moines.

DES MOINES — Even though John Rosentangle died in August, he won the election on Tuesday to a water district commission in Des Moines.

Election results show he won the commission seat to King County Water District 54 with 71 percent of the vote.

Rosentangle died of an illness on Aug. 12, but it turned out to be too late for his name to be removed from the Nov. 5 ballot. District officials were hoping a write-in candidate would win the election, as Rosentangle was running unopposed.

They will now follow procedures to fill a vacant seat on the commission.

And in Aberdeen, the Daily World reported that John Erak, a city councilman who died in June, is holding a narrow lead over his opponent, Alan Richrod. Erik was 81-years-old when he died.

kshamaSEATTLE — Richard Conlin is tentatively declaring victory over socialist challenger Kshama Sawant, who is already looking forward to the next city council election.

Conlin is leading the race for Seattle City Council Pos. 2 with 53.56 percent of the vote. Sawant hasn’t conceded, after getting 46.13 percent of the vote in the first wave of results Tuesday night. The vote count will be updated Wednesday afternoon.

With the Seattle City Council switching to districts, as Charter 19 is winning by a 64.47 percent landslide, Sawant is making noise about a rematch in 2015.

Sawant’s campaign tweeted just before 8:30 p.m. last night:

About an hour later, another tweet from @votesawant:

She tweeted an hour later, saying Conlin would face tough challenges in two years.

coalBELLINGHAM — Voters in Whatcom County appeared to issue an edict on coal trains in Tuesday’s election, voting in all four county-council candidates who opposed the proposal to build a coal export facility near Bellingham.

All four anti-coal terminal council members were leading their opponents as votes came in Tuesday night, including two challengers who looked to topple two pro-coal terminal incumbents. T

he council is currently favorable to the facility that could bring jobs to the area. But, a shift toward more progressive council members would swing the vote.  Progressive-leaning council members include incumbent Ken Mann and Carl Weimer, and challengers Rud Browne and Barry Buchanan. All opposed a proposed coal terminal at Cherry Point.

Incumbents Ben Elenbaas and Michelle Luke, both considered conservative leaning, were trailing by nearly double digits Tuesday night.

Political Action Committees on both sides of the coal-terminal debate donated heavily to the county council races.

More than 41,000 people voted in the county election; big numbers for an off-year election.

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