Story Summary

Latest 2013 Election Results

ElectionAbove are the latest stories on the different elections occurring around Washington state on Nov. 5. Below are some of the latest numbers from the biggest local and state races as posted at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday night.

I-517: Initiatives and Referendum Process 

No — 691,220 votes, 61.1%

Yes — 440,589 votes, 38.9%

I-522: Labeling of Genetically Engineered Food 

No — 632,869 votes, 54.1%

Yes — 537,973 votes, 45.9%

Seattle Mayor 

Ed Murray — 64,177 votes, 55.3%

Mike McGinn — 50,966 votes, 44 %

SeaTac Proposition 1: $15 minimum wage 

Yes — 2,089 votes, 53.0%

No — 1,853 votes, 47.0%

Seattle Council Districts 

Yes — 69,621 votes, 64.8%

No — 37,831 votes, 35.2%

Seattle Council, Position 2 

Richard Conlin — 55,543 votes, 52.8%

Kshama Sawant — 49,363 votes, 46.9%

Legislative District 26, State Senator

Jan Angel R– 17,548 votes, 51.8%

Nathan Schlicher D — 16,311 votes, 48.2%

 

 

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SEATTLE – King County Elections on Tuesday afternoon certified the results of the 2013 general election. Voters returned 562,549 ballots for a turnout of nearly 48 percent, the department said.

Final results are available on the department’s website.

electionThe department said one race, the Auburn City Council Position No. 6, qualified for a mandatory manual (hand) recount, yet to be scheduled. A manual recount is required for a race if the difference is less than 150 votes and also less than one-quarter of 1 percent.

State law does not call for mandatory recounts in county or local ballot measures. A recount can also be requested for elective offices or ballot measures. Requests must be received within two business days of certification. This month’s Thanksgiving holiday makes the deadline Monday, Dec. 2 at 4:30 p.m.

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Finals results in some highly contested or controversial elections:

Seattle mayor — Ed Murray 106,384 votes (52%) to Mike McGinn 97,935 votes (47%)

Seattle City Council Position No. 2 — Kshama Sawant 93,682 votes (51%) to incumbent Richard Conlin’s 90,531 votes (49%)

Seattle Prop. 1 to publicly finance City Council campaigns — No, 97, 545 votes (50%) to Yes, 96,119 votes (50%)

SeaTac Prop. 1 to raise minimum wage to $15 an hour — Yes, 3040 (51%) to No, 2,963 (49%)

State Initiative 522 to label foods with genetically engineered products — No, 895, 516 (51%) to Yes, 857,463 (49%)

State Legislative District 26 — Jan Angel (R) 24,112 votes (52%) to Nathan Schlicter 22,192 (48%)

SEATTLE — Longtime Seattle City Councilman Richard Conlin conceded defeat Friday to socialist candidate Kshama Sawant in the race for the council seat.

His announcement came shortly after King County Elections had released the latest election results, showing Sawant with a 1,640-vote lead; Sawant was leading 88,222  votes to 86,582.

conlinConlin had a substantial lead on Election Night on Nov. 5, but his lead had been declining as more mailed-in ballots were being counted. Sawant overtook Conlin for the first time last Tuesday — one week after the election — when results showed her with a razor-thin, 41-vote edge. It moved up to a 402-vote difference on Wednesday, then 1,148 on Thursday and finally the 1,640-vote lead on Friday.

Sawant will be the first socialist candidate elected to the Seattle City Council in its history.

Conlin was elected to the Seattle City Council in November 1997. He served as council president for 2008-2009 and again for 2010-2011.

Surrounded by friends and supporters Friday, Conlin said, “I want to thank the voters of Seattle for the honor of serving as your Council member for the last 16 years. It has been a privilege to be your representative and I am proud of what we have done together.

“I’m grateful for the good work of my Council staff and hard work of the campaign. I also want to thank the tens of thousands of voters who supported my campaign for a fifth term on the council. And appreciate the many individuals and groups who supported me by endorsing and those who donated to my campaign.

“Unfortunately, it appears that my opponent has received a greater number of votes, and I am formally conceding the election to Ms. Sawant. I hope that she will serve the people of Seattle effectively during her time in office.”

Conlin and his wife, Sue Ann Allen, live in the Madrona neighborhood. Prior to his election to City Council, he served on the Madrona Community Council and was active in the Central Area Neighborhood Plan.

Sawant issued the following statement after Conlin’s concession speech:

“While I do not agree with Richard Conlin’s political positions, I respect that he served on the City Council for 16 years. He ran a strong campaign and I commend him for his willingness to participate in numerous political forums, openly debating the issues with me.

“I will reach out to the people who supported Richard Conlin, working with everyone in Seattle to fight for a minimum wage of $15/hour, affordable housing, and the needs of ordinary people.

“These exciting results show a majority of voters are fed up with the corporate politicians who have presided over the widening chasm between the super-rich and the rest of us. The turnaround of the ballot count in my campaign’s favor is a stunning mandate to move ahead with raising Seattle’s minimum wage to $15/hour.  A majority of voters cast ballots for my campaign which did not take a dime of corporate money, yet succeeded through grass-roots activism.”

Since the signatures on thousands of votes have been challenged, Sawant said, her  campaign will continue to make sure that every vote is counted until the election results are certified on Nov. 26.

“Every additional vote for our campaign shows the broad support for a $15/hour minimum wage, rent control, and a tax on the super-rich to fund mass transit and education.  We need people to donate to fund our voter protection work, and we need volunteers to help correct the challenged ballots so that every one of these votes will count,” Sawant said.

Sawant is a former software engineer, part-time economics professor and activist.   She holds part-time teaching positions at Seattle Central Community College and Seattle University and was a visiting assistant professor at Washington and Lee University. Sawant has run unsuccessfully for the state House of Representatives.

Sawant, who was born in India, graduated with a bachelor’s degree in computer science from the University of Mumbai in 1994. She received her PhD in economics from North Carolina State University in 2003.

sawant

SEATTLE — Socialist candidate Kshama Sawant continued Thursday to widen her lead over longtime Seattle City Councilman Richard Conlin in the race for his council seat, the latest election returns showed.

King County Elections said that, as of 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Savant had 86,223 votes to Conlin’s 85,075 – a difference of 1,148 votes.

sawantConlin had a substantial lead on Election Night Tuesday, but his lead had been declining as more mailed-in ballots were being counted. Sawant overtook Conlin for the first time Tuesday afternoon, when the election results showed her with a razor-thin, 41-vote edge. It moved up to a 402-vote difference on Wednesday.

Sawant would be the first Socialist candidate elected to the Seattle City Council in its history.

Sawant is a former software engineer, part-time economics professor and activist.   She holds part-time teaching positions at Seattle Central Community College and Seattle University and was a visiting assistant professor at Washington and Lee University. Sawant has run unsuccessfully for the state House of Representatives.

Sawant, who was born in India, graduated with a bachelor’s degree in computer science from the University of Mumbai in 1994. She received her PhD in economics from North Carolina State University in 2003.

Conlin was elected to the Seattle City Council in November 1997. He served as council president for 2008-2009 and again for 2010-2011.

Conlin and his wife, Sue Ann Allen, live in the Madrona neighborhood. Prior to his election to City Council, he served on the Madrona Community Council and was active in the Central Area Neighborhood Plan.

Another vote count in the race will be released at 4:30 p.m. Friday.

SEATTLE — Socialist candidate Kshama Sawant  widened her lead over longtime Seattle City Councilman Richard Conlin to 402 votes Wednesday in the race for his council seat, the latest election returns showed.

King County Elections said that, as of 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Savant had 83,095 votes to Conlin’s 82,693.

Socialist Surges Into Lead For Seattle City CouncilConlin had a substantial lead on Election Night Tuesday, but his lead had been declining as more mailed-in ballots were being counted. Sawant overtook Conlin for the first time Tuesday afternoon, when the election results showed her with a razor-thin, 41-vote edge.

Sawant would be the first Socialist candidate elected to the Seattle City Council in its history.

Sawant is a former software engineer, part-time economics professor and activist.   She holds part-time teaching positions at Seattle Central Community College and Seattle University and was a visiting assistant professor at Washington and Lee University. Sawant has run unsuccessfully for the state House of Representatives.

Sawant, who was born in India, graduated with a bachelor’s degree in computer science from the University of Mumbai in 1994. She received her PhD in economics from North Carolina State University in 2003.

Conlin was elected to the Seattle City Council in November 1997. He served as council president for 2008-2009 and again for 2010-2011.

Conlin and his wife, Sue Ann Allen, live in the Madrona neighborhood. Prior to his election to City Council, he served on the Madrona Community Council and was active in the Central Area Neighborhood Plan.

Another vote count in the race will be released at 4:30 p.m. Thursday.

 

 

 

SEATTLE — Socialist candidate Kshama Sawant took a lead over City Councilman Richard Conlin for the first time – albeit, by a razor-thin 41 votes –  in the race for City Council Position No. 2, the latest election returns showed Tuesday.

As of the latest vote count at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Savant had 79,751 votes to Conlin’s 79,710.

Conlin’s lead continues to decrease with late counting.

It is unknown how many ballots are left to be counted, but late ballots often trend left, analysts say.

Sawant would be the first socialist candidate elected to the  City Council in its history.

Another vote count will be released at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday.

SEATTLE — Only 43 votes separated approval or rejection of the SeaTac $15 minimum wage proposal as of Tuesday afternoon, according to the latest vote totals released.

seatac workerSeaTac’s Proposition 1 requiring at least a $15 minimum wage for airport workers and airport-related businesses was winning 54-46% on Election Night, but since then the vote has continually narrowed.  King County Elections’ 4:30 p.m. Tuesday vote count showed the issue was virtually tied at 50%, with only 43 votes separating the two sides — 2,683 yes votes and 2,640 no votes.

King County Elections said its next vote count would be released at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday.

Ballots will continued to be counted and then certified Nov. 26.

Opponents said if they do lose, they won’t rule out a challenge and the issue could end up in a courtroom.

You can track the ballot count on the proposition and other King County elections here. State election results are available here and county results can be found here.

SEATTLE — Socialist city council candidate Kshama Sawant said the race for city council wasn’t over as she continued to shrink incumbent council man’s Richard Conlin’s vote tally Thursday.

kshamaAs of the latest vote count Friday at 8:30 p.m., Conlin held a slim 50-49% advantage, with a difference of 1,237 votes. Conlin’s lead continues to decrease with late counting.

King County Elections will release the next vote count on Tuesday.

It is unknown how many ballots are left to be counted, but late ballots often trend left, Q13 FOX Political Analyst C.R. Douglas said Tuesday. According to the Times, Sawant needs more than 53 percent of the remaining ballots to fall in her favor to pull of a win.

Sawant would be the first socialist candidate elected to the city council in its history.

Politics
11/07/13

McGinn: ‘I was always trying to do the right thing’

SEATTLE — One-term Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn conceded defeat to State Sen. Ed Murray Thursday morning at his campaign headquarters in the International District, taking time to reflect with media members on his campaign and a term in office that “changed the city’s agenda.”

A humble and proud McGinn took to the podium around 10:30 a.m. to congratulate mayor-elect Murray, saying the state legislator had run a strong, well-funded campaign. He said he has high hope for Murray’s time in office, commenting that he and Murray were not far off ideologically on many issues.

Still, he reminded citizens of liberal Seattle that even a progressive mayor needed to be checked often and held accountable.

“We still need to move forward,” he said.

When asked why he thought he lost the race, McGinn said he was outspent nearly 2-to-1, and that his divisive, sometimes confrontational approach didn’t always make him friends.

“I think sometimes I rub people the wrong way,” McGinn said. “But I hope people know I was always trying to do the right thing.”

McGinn would not answer definitively whether or not he would run for office in the future. He said he “fell into politics” the first time, and that if the “stars alligned,” he could see himself running for a different position.

Right now though, he said, he had plenty to focus on in the remainder of his term. He hopes to wrap up a fourth quarter budget, work on policy issues and ease Murray into office with a smooth transitional period.

McGinn often smiled while reflecting on his time in office, saying he indeed loved the job he was soon to lose.

“I love it,” he said. “Every last piece of it. I would love to continue doing it.”

Murray will take office on Jan. 1.

SEattle

From Seattle District Now.com

SEATTLE — With what looks to be the imminent passage of Charter Amendment 19, Seattle residents will soon vote for a council member that represents their neighborhood.

Previously, all council members were voted from at large positions. Now, residents will vote from one of their seven council districts.

The council map was created by Dr. Richard Morrill, the Professor Emeritus of Geography at the University of Washington. Boundaries follow neighborhood lines as much as possible, and all district populations are the same.

Residents will vote for a council member from their respective districts beginning in 2015.

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