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Here’s where the minimum wage is going up in 2018

File photo/CNN

Across the country, including here in Washington state, many Americans will ring in 2018 with a raise.

On December 31 and January 1, the minimum wage will go up in 18 states and about 20 cities and counties, according to an analysis by the National Employment Law Project.

In some cases, the increases put employees closer to a $15 an hour minimum wage, or what workers’ rights advocates call the “living wage.”

Here’s where workers will see their pay rise in the new year, and how much they’ll begin to make:

SeaTac, Washington: $15.64 an hour for hospitality and transportation employees

Seattle, Washington: $15.45 an hour for businesses with 501 or more employees that don’t offer medical benefits; $15 an hour for businesses with 501 or more employees that do offer medical benefits; $14 an hour for businesses with 500 or fewer employees that don’t offer medical benefits; $11.50 an hour for businesses with 500 or fewer employees that do offer medical benefits

Tacoma, Washington: $12 an hour

Washington state: $11.50 an hour

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In New York state, the minimum wage for fast food workers outside New York City will rise from $10.75 to $11.75 over the weekend. It will hit $15 an hour by July 2021.

Nyiasha Colon, a 20-year-old who works at a Dunkin’ Donuts in Rochester, New York and currently makes $11.50 an hour, said she’s looking forward to the increase, even if it’s small.

“There’s things out here that are expensive, and you can’t afford [them],” said Colon, who recently joined the Fight for $15 movement to lobby for higher wages. “I don’t have a coat for the winter or boots for the winter, and I take the bus.”

In some areas, wages are going up, but remain closer to the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. Congress hasn’t voted to raise the minimum wage in more than a decade.

In Missouri, for example, the minimum wage will rise from $7.70 an hour to $7.85 an hour in 2018, a slight uptick said to account for inflation. Other places:

Alaska: $9.84 an hour

Albuquerque, New Mexico: $8.95 an hour

Arizona: $10.50 an hour

Bernalillo County, New Mexico: $8.85 an hour

California: $11 an hour for businesses with 26 or more employees; $10.50 an hour for businesses with 25 or fewer employees

Colorado: $10.20 an hour

Cupertino, California: $13.50 an hour

El Cerrito, California: $13.60 an hour

Flagstaff, Arizona: $11 an hour

Florida: $8.25 an hour

Hawaii: $10.10 an hour

Los Altos, California: $13.50 an hour

Maine: $10 an hour

Michigan: $9.25 an hour

Milpitas, California: $12 an hour

Minneapolis, Minnesota: $10 an hour for businesses with more than 100 employees

Minnesota: $9.65 an hour for businesses with annual gross revenue of $500,000 or more; $7.87 an hour for businesses with annual gross revenue of less than $500,000

Missouri: $7.85 an hour

Montana: $8.30 an hour

Mountain View, California: $15 an hour

New Jersey: $8.60 an hour

New York: $13 an hour for standard New York City businesses with 11 for more employees; $12 an hour for standard New York City businesses with 10 or fewer employees; $11 an hour for standard workers in Long Island and Westchester; $10.40 for standard workers in the rest of New York state; $13.50 for fast food workers in New York City; $11.75 for fast food workers in the rest of the state

Oakland, California: $13.23 an hour

Ohio: $8.30 an hour

Palo Alto, California: $13.50 an hour

Rhode Island: $10.10 an hour

Richmond, California: $13.41 an hour

San Jose, California: $13.50 an hour

San Mateo, California: $13.50 an hour for standard businesses; $12 an hour for nonprofits

Santa Clara, California: $13 an hour

South Dakota: $8.85 an hour

Sunnyvale, California: $15 an hour

Vermont: $10.50 an hour