Download the Q13 News weather app here

Should Washingtonians be allowed to grow recreational pot at home? State wants you to weigh in

SEATTLE – Medical marijuana patients in Washington can grow pot at home, but now the state is considering allowing the general public to grow recreational pot at home as well.

“Other states that have legalized marijuana have allowed home grows,” Rep. Shelley Kloba said.

Washington is now weighing the possibility of allowing people to grow up to 4 marijuana plants at home.

“I hope that people who are currently growing can give us some input into this process,” Kloba said.

If you ask licensed pot growers and retail owners, many of them are opposed.

“Our members are very concerned about the possibility of loosening regulations to allow the general public to grow cannabis at home,” Aaron Pickus said.

Pickus is speaking for The Washington Cannabusiness Association, which represents about 70 marijuana companies. The groups says they are more worried about the feds than any financial impact to the industry.

“Being cautious of what the federal government might do with the current administration that is very skeptical of legal marketplaces,” Pickus said.

“I can understand their viewpoint on that they have made a great investment,” Kloba said.

But Kloba still wants to learn more before she makes up her mind.

“The bottom line for me is still making sure that we are taking all the profit out of the black market,” Kloba said.

Kloba believes creating more legal options to access pot could put a dent on the black market.

The state has asked the Liquor and Cannabis Board to study the issue. The board will look into the possible impacts to public safety, the impact to children and how other states are doing.

The board will hold a public hearing on Oct. 4 at its headquarters in Olympia at 10 a.m at 3000 Pacific Avenue.

If you cannot make that hearing, you can submit an email to the board until October 11 at rules@lcb.wa.gov.

The agency will then submit the findings of its study to state lawmakers by December.