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Today we tie the record for longest dry streak in Seattle: 51 days

A red sun rises over Tacoma on Aug. 7, 2017. (Q13 News photo)

SEATTLE — Lingering smoke from British Columbia and local fires have made it really difficult for many people, especially those with asthma and allergies to be outdoors.

But by Wednesday we should start to turn the corner to get back to a more normal air quality pattern at least for Western Washington. Fingers crossed!

Monday marks day 51 in our dry stretch with no measurable rain at SeaTac.  At midnight, we will break the record streak of 51 straight dry days set back in 1951.  We are on track to add many days to this long dry stretch.

More records to break

If we get above 80 degrees today, it will be the 10th consecutive day with a high above 80 at SeaTac.  The longest run of 80+ days is 15 days, which happened in July of 2015.  We could break that record if we top out above 80 through the weekend.

Another warm and hazy sunshine day on Monday.  High temps will likely be in the low 80s.  Normal is 77 for this part of early August.

A bit less hazy Tuesday -- still sunny and warm with highs in the low 80s. This will be our 52nd day without measurable rain at SeaTac and a new record for longest dry streak in Seattle weather history.

We stay sunny and warm (mid/upper 80s) through the end of the work week. Friday night into Saturday we might finally see a pattern shift that could deliver some raindrops to our parched area, or clouds at the very least.  And it will be cooler over the weekend — upper 70s to near 80.

Summer sky watching

Monday will be our full “sturgeon moon.”  It’s named for the fish which is most readily caught in late July and early August.  With the haze in the air, the moon will be orange and spooky.

The nights of August 11th and 12th will be the peak of the annual Perseid meteor showers.

The morning of August 21st is the full solar eclipse from Newport, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina.  Around Puget Sound, while we will not be in the path of totality, the moon’s shadow will cover about 92% of the sun in our area.