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Trump outlines policy plan for first 100 days in White House

WASHINGTON — President-elect Donald Trump unveiled plans Monday for his first 100 days in office, including proposals related to immigration, trade deals and defense policy.

“Whether it’s producing steel, building cars, or curing disease, I want the next generation of production and innovation to happen right here, in our great homeland: America — creating wealth and jobs for American workers,” Trump said in the two-and-a-half-minute online video statement. “As part of this plan, I’ve asked my transition team to develop a list of executive actions we can take on day one to restore our laws and bring back our jobs.”

Among his first actions, the Republican said he would “issue our notification of intent to withdraw from the TransPacific Partnership” and replace it with negotiating “fair bilateral trade deals.” Trump campaigned on a promise to halt the progress of the TPP trade deal, an agreement President Barack Obama had hoped would be a part of his administration’s trade legacy.

On immigration, Trump promised to “investigate all abuses of visa programs that undercut the American worker,” but did not mention his signature campaign promise of building a wall along the border with Mexico.

He said he will kill “job-killing restrictions” on the energy industry, including on clean coal and shale energy.

He said he will ask the Defense Department and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to develop a comprehensive plan against cyber-attacks and all other forms of attacks.

Like the wall, Trump made no mention of some of other signature items, like repealing Obama’s signature health care law and spending $1 trillion on infrastructure — all measures that are likely to require the support of Congress.

Instead, he focused exclusively on campaign promises that would not require congressional approval.

Still, Trump and his team, including Vice President-elect Mike Pence, have offered hints at their immediate priorities after they take office. And time and speed are very likely to be key factors.

Republicans control the House and Senate, as well as the White House — but Democrats struggled to pass key items, like Obamacare, when they were in a similar position eight years ago.