Crowd turns its back on Hillary Clinton for group selfie

Hillary Clinton waves to a selfie-taking crowd at a recent campaign event in Orlando, Florida.

Hillary Clinton waves to a selfie-taking crowd at a recent campaign event in Orlando, Florida.

(CNN) — At a recent campaign event, Hillary Clinton climbed on a box to address a room packed with young people. But instead of facing the Democratic presidential nominee, the audience turned their backs on her en masse.

Further evidence of Clinton’s challenge in winning over millennials?

No. As it turned out, the Orlando, Florida, crowd wasn’t being disrespectful. With their smartphones and cameras held high, they were snapping selfies — trying to capture a historic moment by sharing a photo frame with the presidential candidate.

Clinton’s full-time photographer, Barbara Kinney, snapped a photo of the scene, which apparently happened after Clinton invited the crowd to turn around and snap a group selfie.

Kinney wasn’t expecting her photo to get so much attention, but since designer and Clinton supporter Victor Ng posted it Sunday to Twitter, it’s been shared more than 19,000 times.

The image isn’t the only one to show our recent obsession with selfies. Who can forget the moment when Ellen DeGeneres’ selfie at the Oscars in 2014 nearly crashed the Internet?

Or when Queen Elizabeth II accidentally photobombed a selfie taken at the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow?

And remember the iconic selfie taken of the Pope inside St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican in 2013? The pontiff had a private audience with 500 youths from the Diocese of Piacenza-Bobbio.

And what of the controversy surrounding the selfie of the endangered monkey with the cheeky grin?

After a wildlife photographer stepped away and the crested black macaque snapped a self-portrait with the unattended camera, animal-rights organization PETA filed a lawsuit for the monkey to win copyright of the image.