Bellingham OKs resolution against Dakota Access pipeline

Protestors gather at the blocked entrance to a construction site for the Dakota Access Pipeline to express their opposition to the pipeline, near an encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's to protest against the construction of the new oil pipeline, near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on September 3, 2016.
The Indian reservation in North Dakota is the site of the largest gathering of Native Americans in more than 100 years. Indigenous people from across the US are living in camps on the Standing Rock reservation as they protest the construction of the new oil pipeline which they fear will destroy their water supply.
 / AFP / Robyn BECK        (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

Protestors gather at the blocked entrance to a construction site for the Dakota Access Pipeline to express their opposition to the pipeline, near an encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's to protest against the construction of the new oil pipeline, near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on September 3, 2016. The Indian reservation in North Dakota is the site of the largest gathering of Native Americans in more than 100 years. Indigenous people from across the US are living in camps on the Standing Rock reservation as they protest the construction of the new oil pipeline which they fear will destroy their water supply. / AFP / Robyn BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

BELLINGHAM, Wash. (AP) _ The Bellingham City Council has passed a resolution supporting the Standing Rock Sioux and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes in their opposition of the four-state Dakota Access pipeline.

The Bellingham Herald reports (http://bit.ly/2caShy3 ) that the resolution calls on federal agencies to respect the status and treaty rights of recognized tribes.

The Standing Rock Sioux tribe is challenging the Army Corps of Engineers’ decision to grant about 200 permits at water crossings for pipeline, which goes through the Dakotas and Iowa to Illinois. The tribe says the project will disturb sacred sites and impact drinking water.

The action comes after hundreds gathered in front of the White House Tuesday to protest the pipeline as part of a wider “Day of Action.”