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Local couple to file complaint over Super Bowl ticket fail: ‘We’re sitting … outside the stadium, can’t get in’

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Melanie and Anton Faulk, of Bellevue, bought Super Bowl tickets, but this as as close as these 12s got to the game. (Photo courtesy of family)

Melanie and Anton Faulk, of Bellevue, bought Super Bowl tickets, but this as as close as these 12s got to the game. (Photo courtesy of family)

BELLEVUE, Wash. — The Attorney General’s Office wants to hear from 12s who didn’t get to go to the Super Bowl because ticket brokers didn’t come through.

Melanie Faulk, of Bellevue, and her family are diehard Seahawks fans. And early in the season, they had a feeling the team was headed to another Super Bowl.

“In September, Anton said we’ll dip into our life savings and we’ll pick up tickets to go to the game, if we get in,” Faulk said.

So, right after the NFC Championship game, they booked flights, arranged to stay with friends in Phoenix and then went online to find game tickets.

"We looked at the NFL Exchange, StubHub and Vivid Seats," she said.

Vivid was the only site with specific seats listed. Since the Faulks had brought from Vivid Seats before and everything worked out, they felt confident using them again. But when they got down to Phoenix, they found out Vivid didn't have their tickets.

"They're like, 'The seller still hasn't dropped them off, but we're sure they're going to. They're reputable, we've dealt with them before,'" Faulk said.

But at 1 p.m. on Game Day, the broker called them and said they couldn't fulfill the ticket order.

"They didn't really give a good explanation," she said. "We just sat there going, what are we going to do? We're sitting there, outside the stadium, can't get in."

The Attorney General's Office says what Vivid and other ticket brokers did to Super Bowl fans isn't necessarily illegal.

"Some brokers call this a 'try and get' policy, which means they'll sell you a ticket they don't have and get it for you," said state Assistant Attorney General Jake Bernstein.

But they have to clearly disclose that policy.

Faulk said her broker didn't, so she is going to file a complaint. She said that even though the company gave her a 200% refund, the money doesn't change anything.

"No, because it doesn't pay for the experience; we'll never get to be there for that," she said.

The Attorney General's Office says any fan who had a similar experience should contact their office and file a consumer complaint so they can investigate.

To file a consumer complaint, visit this website and click the "Consumer Complaint" button.

To see a Q13 FOX News earlier story on this, click here >>>

 

 

 

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10 comments

  • chris corbray

    I listed tickets on NFL Exchange and Stub Hub. They ACTUALLY do show specific rows, sections, and seat number. I don’t want to call you out, and feel real bad for you, and people who did get messed over. I had a friend that had this happen to as well. I believe these people bought tickets on EBay. EBay is credible, but mainly if you buy them from individuals. Vivid and other 2nd and 3rd party brokers were selling tickets in a very particular and funny way. They would outline 4-8 sections or more in the stadium, and actually say, “We don’t have seat specifics but you will be sitting somewhere in these blacked lines we drew up.” I thought it was crazy myself. They said others would give them tickets sometimes before the game, but it never happened.

    Again I feel sorry for these people. But NFL Exchange is the SAFEST way to buy tickets. Ticket owners list there’s with the NFL. When tickets are bought, the NFL sends buyer a link to tickets, and ticket sellers code for those tickets are transferred instantly so there is NO funny business. The next safest in my opinion is Stub Hub and sites like that. Then EBay if you use the trusted sellers. NEVER use craigslist.

    Again, sorry for those who got screwed. Use the methods I listed and you’ll be safe in the future.

  • Pam

    I had this happen at The Conference Championship last yr thru another ticcket company. If figured my son and I were outta luck and $1200 in the hole. Fortunately, rhis company had a “ticket seller” on permises and with in an hour we had offical tickets and even better seats. This was at The Clink but the disappointment of the possibility of not getting in and losing all that time and money was enormous. Since we had taken Amtrak from Bellingham to Seattle, we started scoping out local bars in which to watch the game. Fortunately it worked out for us!

    • izzy

      Sorry but you seriously need to invest in some writing classes, I have never seen so many mistakes in one message for a very long time.

  • italianirish

    To be clear, anyone who purchased from the hundreds of other companies out there selling tickets to this were told “too bad” and just given a refund. These folks received DOUBLE their money back–meaning at least several thousand extra dollars that Vivid Seats didn’t need to give them. The terms and conditions of every secondary ticket company say “If there’s an issue with your tickets, you get your money back and that’s it.” And every order has to agree to those terms before purchasing. Yes, without question, it sucks to not see the game you wanted to see, but it sounds like Vivid Seats went way above and beyond what every other company was doing and what they were legally obligated to do to try and make it right.

  • Marty Sander

    I just dont understand how selling something you dont actually have can be legal in any way. These ticket companies are also pricing ticket’s right out of an average income families price range. I paid $320 for a $120 ticket to the
    Panthers/Seahawks playoff game. But yet somehow usuary laws do not apply to these agencies. Isnt selling something you dont have fraud? I would really like to know how they got these “laws”, passed, and why our elected officials have not addressed this issue. I will sell you a car for $3,000. I dont actually have it, but I will sell it to you anyway. Sound reasonable?

  • izzy

    “Since the Faulks had brought from Vivid Seats before and everything worked out,… nice.. anywhoo, these whiners got 200% refund, of course not the plane tickets.. so stop with the suing! You crybabies fill up the courts!! if you have to DIP INTO LIFE SAVINGS to go to a game, you probably should not go.

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