Aaron Rodgers: ‘I don’t think God cares’ who wins football games

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Aaron Rodgers #12 of the Green Bay Packers reacts during the first quarter of the 2015 NFC Championship game against the Seattle Seahawks at CenturyLink Field on January 18, 2015 in Seattle, Washington.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

Aaron Rodgers #12 of the Green Bay Packers reacts during the first quarter of the 2015 NFC Championship game against the Seattle Seahawks at CenturyLink Field on January 18, 2015 in Seattle, Washington. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

GREEN BAY, Wisc. — Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers said he doesn’t think God cares about the outcomes of football games, the LA Times reported.

Rodgers was responding to listener questions Tuesday on a weekly radio show with ESPN Wisconsin. The question comes after the Seahawks beat the odds and overcame a 16 – 0 first-half deficit and beat the Packers 28 – 22 in overtime Sunday.

The quarterback was asked if such a big loss shakes his faith since athletes often thank God for their successes.

According to SI.com, radio host Jason Wilde read the following question:

“[The reader] says, ‘I always find it a little off-putting when athletes, actors and anybody says, “This is what God wanted,” or “I want to thank God for helping us win today,” anything along those lines when a game or award is won. I’m paraphrasing here, but you get the gist. Personally, with all the chaos in the world, I’m not sure God really cares about the outcome of a game or an awards show. What do you think of statements such as these? You’ve obviously got your faith. Does what happens on Sunday impact your relationship with God or your faith at all?””

Rodgers’ response:

“I agree with her. I don’t think God cares a whole lot about the outcome. He cares about the people involved, but I don’t think he’s a big football fan.”

Seahawks QB Russell Wilson told reporter Peter King that a divine influence made Sunday’s NFC Championship so exciting.

“That’s God setting it up, to make it so dramatic, so rewarding, so special,” Wilson reportedly told King. “I’ve been through a lot in life, and had some ups and downs. It’s what’s led me to this day.”

Rodgers has previously said he is religious.

“I just try to follow Jesus’ example, leading by example,” Rodgers said before Super Bowl XLV.

The Seahawks play the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XLIX on Feb. 1.

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24 comments

  • Eric taft

    He’s absolutely right. I’ve always found it a little stupid when a player thanks god for a touchdown. Pretty sure it is the least of God’s concern. A rod is a level headed realist. You got gotta respect that.

  • Mary J. Eakins

    Everyone always says God Which God lots of Gods out there, what’s his name? Do I think he cares about a football game not really? If people are referring to the creator of the universe you will find his name in the bible if not within its pages than in the index in most of the books out there. Clue his sons name is Jesus.

  • Dawn

    Well I thanked God the Seahawks won on Sunday many times. Saturday night they discovered a large tumor in my mother’s brain. Instead of watching the game at a sports bar by Century Link as planned. My family and I watched at Swedish Neurology icu. As silly as it sounds we just couldn’t take anymore bad news. We watched with several parishioners from a local church there to pray for another critical patient. After watching 3 quarters of a depressing game in a depressing place we came back! It was unbelievable. And it gave us hope at our darkest time. So I thank god that the Seahawks won for my mom and my family.

    • chris

      Meanwhile, in Greenbay, a woman in almost the same situation sits in the hospital dying while surrounded by family and does not get her prayers answered the way you asked. All i see is life going on….some fortunate and others not so much. Its amazing how much we dismiss our own potential while waiting for prayers to be answered to unlock them.

  • Andy Weber

    I think there is a lot more dialogue to be had on this topic. I don’t have any problems when people give the glory to God and thank God after games/awards, etc….but I think it’s important that these same players take into account James 1 and are thankful and take joy in their defeats too–because that too is an amazing opportunity to grow stronger and be rewarding in a different way. It’s not all about what we want or what we think God wants for us in the moment.

  • Jackson

    So when people say God, do you suppose they mean Religion? Because there are a lot of different religions out there, and perceptions are just as individual as the finger print; it would be quite prideful to suggest that your religion is the basis for every reference made to God.

    God doesn’t care about sports; I’ll tell you what a God is concerned with-the Truth, nothing else but Truth…

    …and God said to me, “If you wish to find me, seek me not in the pages of any book, for I won’t be there; rather, search for me in the trees used to create such crazy ideologies.”

  • bkhlavac@yahoo.com

    Well said, Andy Weber. I actually was sending a letter to one of the players on the Packers, thanking him for his humility and the lessons he has taught my son after a devastating error and loss as his. Perhaps the loss, for the Packers fans, was meant to be a lesson to other kids or adults of how to handle such losses and what appropriate reactions may or may not be.

  • Heidi Vargas

    You are right God may not care about football, but he cares about his children that play football. If you are playing football you were born with a God given talent. You may work for it and use it, but you can’t take any child and make him a Quarter back. Wilson won the Super Bowl and remained humble, thankful and gave God the glory. When he won this last game he stopped and prayed on National TV with people watching . Wilson gives an example of never giving up, staying humble and giving God the glory. If you think God doesn’t care about that, then you do not know God

  • Rod

    Well maybe Aaron Rogers should care about what God thinks so he could help him beat the Seahawks and explain how in the world everything went right for the Seahawks and ohh so wrong for Greenbay.
    #ibelieveinRuss
    #PackersGotKEARSE-D
    Go Hawks! !!

  • Shaun

    Yes God might not be a football fan or some jerks think that people shouldn’t thank him in their victories in life, but you fools are wrong, just like aron wrongers. It’s about God’s relationship with man through His Son Jesus Christ, and if any of you fools have read the Bible lately it clearly states the promise of the Almighty, anything you ask in the name of Jesus with true faith will be given unto you, and we who believe certainly enjoy God’s favors while the doubters lick their wounds of defeat in every situation of life.

  • daryl cofield

    the pacific northwest is the most unchurched part of the united states. lots of people mountain climbing and kayaking but not too many going to church. Russell Wilson has got to be the most prominent Christian in the pacific northwest. Because of Russell Wilson’s example, behavior, public declaration of faith, and thanks to God, some people are thinking about where they stand with God. 2 Peter 3:9 “The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. Instead he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance.” Matthew 10:32 “Whoever acknowledges me before others, I will also acknowledge before my Father in heaven.” Wilson is special. You know it. I know it. The Seahawks know it.

  • nadine marshall

    There is a big difference between being religious and believing in God! People, players, ect. thank God for the gifts,talents, they have been given to do the things in which they love and enjoy! People get cancer, become sick, ect. Not because of God but because of the sins of man! All these things can be healed if you truly believe and have faith that God will heal you. This is what Russell teaches the kids at children’s hospital to have faith and believe! I believe God shows his grace thru Russell Wilson and he truly believes and holds a very strong faith and shares it with his players. God loves football and he blesses the seahawks because they believe in him and give him glory and seek him first! If you have doubt just sit back and watch and you will be amazed!

    • chris

      So the kids who die didnt believe hard enough?!? Your way of thinking is dangerous and my faith just collapsed a bit while reading your post.

    • vreyes

      Gods team is the packers y do you think the g is on the helmet. Win or loose HIS team will always be the packers. Seahawks? The city who pass pot? The team that has the most led users? I don’t think so

  • enoch1root

    I think it is extremely arrogant of players to pray for wins. You see them on the sideline during games when they need a FG to win. I think this just distracts God and then something bad happens in South America, like a mudslide or something. Just leave him alone until afterwards and just thank him. We’d all begetter off.