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Is violence new May Day tradition?

SEATTLE — It was May Day mayhem that forced several Seattle businesses to pick up the pieces.

may day take downSun Liquor Distillery boarded up their smashed glass door by Thursday . The random attack happened while dozens of patrons were inside enjoying the night Wednesday. Some businesses now say it is unfortunate that May Day is getting a dangerous reputation.

Anarchists took over the streets of Capitol Hill.

The angry verbal attacks soon escalated into property damage.

“I called the owner to fix it I tried to calm everybody down of course they were busy at that time so it was even more stressful,” said Sun Liquor Distillery manager Eli Hetrick.

Seattle businesses and taxpayers are yet again fronting the cost for May Day clean up.  The exact price tag is being calculated but easily in the thousands according to the city.

“it is unfortunate because it ruins the credibility of these movements you know by the actions of a few,” said Hetrick.

Historically  May Day is about employee rights and immigration reform. Latino Advocacy helped organize the thousands who marched peacefully.

“We want to make it clear that we are not a part of that we are a separate group we’ve been doing this for many years,” said Maru Mora Villalpando.

For decades May Day had purpose but now it is getting a dangerous reputation something Latino Advocacy wants nothing to do with.

“it is disappointing I don’t want to lie to you I don’t like it,” said Villalpando.

Mayor Mike McGinn is certainly disappointed as well.

“I sure hope not we are a bigger better city than this you know I look at this and I am disappointed that this is what the world sees of us,” said
McGinn. Seattle Police are also determined to not let anarchists hijack May Day for good.

“The city of Seattle is better than that I don’t think as someone who works here I would let 50 to 60 if that many define what the city of Seattle is,” said
Seattle Police Assistant Chief Paul McDonagh.

3 comments

  • Robin

    Would it really hurt to use proper punctuation in this article? There are multiple sentences running together without a period to separate them. This article should never have gone up on your website in this condition. Very unprofessional.

  • Barney

    Now that May Day is over, the vandals can go back to their usual goofing off, tagging and graffiti projects. Wow, you put a sticker on a stop sign! Great accomplishments you idiots.

  • Mel

    This article is completely biased and incorrect! May Day is a day for Anarchists!

    On May 1st, 1886, tens of thousands of workers across the country went on a 3 day general strike in support of the 8 hour work day. On May 3rd, workers in Chicago attempted to confront strikebreakers that were entering a plant where workers had been locked out since February and supported the call for the 8 hour work day. The strikebreakers has the protection of hundreds of police, and when the striking workers surged forward to meet them at the gates, the police opened fired; killing 2-6 workers. The next day on May 4th, in response, ANARCHISTS called for a rally at Haymarket Square in Chicago. When police ordered the rally to disperse and marched forward in formation, a bomb was thrown toward the police: a riot ensued; untold numbers of workers were killed and injured by police bullets. The bomb as well as gunshots from mostly friendly fire killed eight cops. 8 Anarchists were later imprisoned in retribution and known as the Haymarket Martyrs. Each was tried for murder. The incident and trial led to indignation around the world as the prosecution conceded that none of the 8 Anarchists threw the bomb. The 8 were NOT on trial for throwing bombs, but for being radical labor agitators and Anarchists. 2 had their sentences commuted to life in prison. One received 15 years. 4 were eventually executed. And, 1 cheated the hangman and committed suicide in prison.

    THAT is the real history behind May Day!

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