Homeowner makes stink over smell of her neighbor’s weed

PORTLAND (KATU) — A Portland woman is raising a stink over the smell of her neighbor’s weed.

Gloria Peterson says medical marijuana plants growing in her neighbors’ house might be good medicine for her neighbors. But she claims all that smoke and plant pollen is making her sick. She wants the city to step in and do something.

“My sinuses burn, my throat burns, my eyes burn from it,” Peterson said.

But Portland police, City Hall, the Department of Environmental Quality and Multnomah County Health Department say they’re in a legal bind. If you’re approved by the Oregon medical marijuana program, you can grow it, smoke it, and even let pollen travel next door to your neighbors, without any penalty.

The county health department said it does investigate the source of bad smells, just not marijuana.

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19 comments

  • chas

    I hate to suggest the woman is misinformed, and I don;t want to say she doesn't find the odor unpleasant,

    But there is NO pollen.. these are female plants.. pollen RUINS 'the good stuff' and you can ONLY get seedless grass by removing any males before they EVER get a chance to pollinate..

    SO before she blames pollen, she might want to understand thee is NO pollen to blame.

  • Anonymous

    You can be allergic to pot. My fiance is whenever he gets a wiff he feels like he is about to have a heart attack. I also had a girlfriend in High School who would get hives from the stuff. While I used to smoke & am all for it. Please at least find ways of taking in consideration of those who may not enjoy the smell. I hate going in the bus with my fifteen month old & having to sit near someone who reeks of the stuff. Just the smell alone can give me a lil buzz so imagine the concerns I have for my child. This lady may find some annoyed yet she does bring up a good point. Just saying agree to disagree. And I have to say I unfortunitly agree to some degree….;-)

    • John H

      Non-sense! You can't get a "lil buzz" just by smelling it. You have to inhale the activated THC to get a buzz – to activate it, you must apply heat. So, no buzz for you. Sounds like your fiance has anxiety issues not immune issues.

      “Odor sensitivity is known as multiple chemical sensitivity. This is a phenomenon where exposure to a given group of chemicals triggers a behavior that is phenomenologically similar to a panic attack.” (Reinhartz, 1997)

      “Patients with MCS present to their physicians with a startling spectrum of complaints. These complaints are often presented in a manner highly suggestive of a psychiatric disorder.” (Multiple Chemical Sensitivities: Addendum to Biological Markers in Immonotoxicology, 1992)

      “In 16 [of 20] MCS patients at least one psychiatric diagnosis according to SCID was found (Table 1), with mood disorders being most frequent, followed by somatoform and anxiety disorders.” (Bornschein, Hausteiner, Rommelt, & Nowak, 2008, p. 445)

      “Our study supports previous studies (20,21) that do not suggest a direct somatic [bodily] cause of MCS. Instead, researchers draw parallels to somatoform disorders [mental disorders] (20,24,25). Cognitive processing and cognitive ‘sensitization’ are discussed as the psychobiological mechanisms underlying MCS.” (Bornschein, Hausteiner, Rommelt, & Nowak, 2008, p. 448)

      “The results of our study suggest that a patient’s attributions can be deceptive and a history of “multiple chemical sensitivities” must be questioned in the majority of cases. Other causes (e.g., cognitive sensitization, somatoform disorders [mental disorders], and other organic or psychiatric illnesses) always have to be considered.” (Bornschein, Hausteiner, Rommelt, & Nowak, 2008, p. 449)

      Furthermore, regarding the woman's complaints, the cannabis grower should be using a carbon filter to minimize or eliminate any escaping odors.

  • SLC

    chip in and get her an air purifier also maybe she should go see an allergist and take antihistimine… my daughter is allergic to pine pollen can I get the neighbors to remove their pine trees? I'm allergic to dog,dust and dustmites… you have to adapt suck it upadn stop making things difficult for everyone else JUST FOR ATTeNtiON those arent even serious "side effects" if she is allergic they are definately eassy to manage with medication

  • Rita

    Sorry guys, but I agree! My husband and I live in an apartment building and every time our neighbor downstairs smoked pot (which was often) it would come in through our bathroom and smell things up. It was horrible. Even with an air purifier and the door shut it would make our kids go into a hacking fit.

    • John H

      Rita, your situation is different. In your case there was actual smoke. In this woman's case, there is no smoke and no pollen.

  • Dani

    Even though I condone the use of pot, I have used pot and my fiance still smokes, just like cigarettes, people need to respect boundaries. This lady pays her rent too. If she doesn't want to smell the stuff, why should she be forced to do so?? That isn't fair, or respectful of how other people live. Why are we always catering to only certain groups of people these days, and completely disregarding or even ostracizing others? I'm siding with her, regardless of whether she's just some crazy lady, or her issues are legitimate. She has rights too.

    • John H

      Her issue is NOT legitimate. She is claiming allergies to a 'smell' which is non-sense.

      As I wrote before:
      “Odor sensitivity is known as multiple chemical sensitivity. This is a phenomenon where exposure to a given group of chemicals triggers a behavior that is phenomenologically similar to a panic attack.” (Reinhartz, 1997)

      “Patients with MCS present to their physicians with a startling spectrum of complaints. These complaints are often presented in a manner highly suggestive of a psychiatric disorder.” (Multiple Chemical Sensitivities: Addendum to Biological Markers in Immonotoxicology, 1992)

      “In 16 [of 20] MCS patients at least one psychiatric diagnosis according to SCID was found (Table 1), with mood disorders being most frequent, followed by somatoform and anxiety disorders.” (Bornschein, Hausteiner, Rommelt, & Nowak, 2008, p. 445)

      “Our study supports previous studies (20,21) that do not suggest a direct somatic [bodily] cause of MCS. Instead, researchers draw parallels to somatoform disorders [mental disorders] (20,24,25). Cognitive processing and cognitive ‘sensitization’ are discussed as the psychobiological mechanisms underlying MCS.” (Bornschein, Hausteiner, Rommelt, & Nowak, 2008, p. 448)

      “The results of our study suggest that a patient’s attributions can be deceptive and a history of “multiple chemical sensitivities” must be questioned in the majority of cases. Other causes (e.g., cognitive sensitization, somatoform disorders [mental disorders], and other organic or psychiatric illnesses) always have to be considered.” (Bornschein, Hausteiner, Rommelt, & Nowak, 2008, p. 449)

      The grower ought to control the smell with a carbon filter. The woman ought to quit being such a royal pain in the rear. She probably complains about EVERYTHING and now she finally got some attention.

  • KMW

    If it were cigarettes, would this even be news worthy? Also, there is no such thing as a contact high. Is her throat and eyes burn, she should stop smoking it. Otherwise, I am not sure how it would have the effect.

  • John H

    No smoke, no pollen = No allergy. The woman is mental.

    As I wrote before:
    “Odor sensitivity is known as multiple chemical sensitivity. This is a phenomenon where exposure to a given group of chemicals triggers a behavior that is phenomenologically similar to a panic attack.” (Reinhartz, 1997)

    “Patients with MCS present to their physicians with a startling spectrum of complaints. These complaints are often presented in a manner highly suggestive of a psychiatric disorder.” (Multiple Chemical Sensitivities: Addendum to Biological Markers in Immonotoxicology, 1992)

    “In 16 [of 20] MCS patients at least one psychiatric diagnosis according to SCID was found (Table 1), with mood disorders being most frequent, followed by somatoform and anxiety disorders.” (Bornschein, Hausteiner, Rommelt, & Nowak, 2008, p. 445)

    “Our study supports previous studies (20,21) that do not suggest a direct somatic [bodily] cause of MCS. Instead, researchers draw parallels to somatoform disorders [mental disorders] (20,24,25). Cognitive processing and cognitive ‘sensitization’ are discussed as the psychobiological mechanisms underlying MCS.” (Bornschein, Hausteiner, Rommelt, & Nowak, 2008, p. 448)

    “The results of our study suggest that a patient’s attributions can be deceptive and a history of “multiple chemical sensitivities” must be questioned in the majority of cases. Other causes (e.g., cognitive sensitization, somatoform disorders [mental disorders], and other organic or psychiatric illnesses) always have to be considered.” (Bornschein, Hausteiner, Rommelt, & Nowak, 2008, p. 449)

    The grower ought to control the smell with a carbon filter. The woman ought to quit being such a royal pain in the rear. She probably complains about EVERYTHING and now she finally got some attention.

    Amazing this even made the news. Seriously folks! Educate thyself before reporting on such non-sense.

  • Saskia

    John H., she is complaining about the smoke. Don't you know that smoke can travel over a fence? Why are you so obsessed with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity?

    • John H

      Please… Unless there are 50 people all smoking simultaneously AND the wind just happens to be blowing her direction….then maybe I can see the problem. But the news clearly reported on pollen (and smoke). But the smoke (if there was any) would dissipate in the air and be thinned to an almost unrecognizable level.

      I'm obsessed with MCS because that is exactly what the problem is. She doesn't like the smell of the growing plants in her neighbors garage – it bothers her. But it most certainly isn't an allergy! The smoke would have to be thick (again if there was any) and would have to be travelling on the wind directly to her. There isn't any pollen, so there is no issue there.

      She should take a Claritan. The grower should use a filter.

      The grower is an idiot. Discretion is the better part of valor – if the grower were discreet, the lady would never know its there.

      • Saskia

        John H., smoke from a single cigarette can trigger asthma at a greater distance. People with allergies can react to very small amounts of substances they are allergic to and people can be allergic to marijuana. See the abstracts at the bottom of this page: http://www.aaaai.org/ask-the-expert/reaction-cann….

        Why are you saying she should take a Claritin? You said it isn’t an allergy. You said she was “mental” so how would Claritin help with that? How would being “mental” cause the physical symptoms she is complaining about?

        I don’t see any reason to think she has MCS, but in any case your quotes about MCS are biased. Here’s a quote from an Australian government scientific review of MCS:
        “The report identifies several biologically plausible hypotheses worthy of further scientific investigation to explain the underlying mechanism(s) (modes of action) for MCS. Elucidating the biological basis for MCS will provide directions for clinical diagnosis and improve treatment options for MCS.” http://www.nicnas.gov.au/Publications/Information

  • MCSgirl

    Aw, I feel for this woman as I have MCS too and a neighbor who won't quit smoking the stuff. Our backyards are back to back so using the clothesline or just being in the yard or trying to keep a window open for fresh air is impossible. Most times, his weed smells like a skunk, only worse. Not in Oregon though, not in a legal state, but Florida.

  • Fred schmuck

    Bottom line is, no law for smells!
    It's a good thing, cause we can smell her BO all the way into Washington county! Should the news cover that story? Exposé her private medical needs and then broadcast it. Does anyone think about how they compromise the security of this grower. His patients, his family etc.
    It's amazing what people will do to see themselves on the news!!

  • Vinnie

    Smoking odors, are the hardest odors to eliminate, why do they hang, around when the sources of the odors are no longer there? The offensive smell associated with odors is mostly made up from gases released from their sources. These invisible gases become attached onto floating air molecules, which drift with the air currents in the room. Over time some dissipate and others most notably smoking and urine odors, penetrate walls, carpet and drapes. Air-ReNu a paint additive, turns any wall surface, into a permanent air, purification system no electricity or filters required.


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