Local News

Supreme Court has menu of options in gay marriage case

 WASHINGTON – Four years ago, many gay rights advocates shook their heads when super-lawyers Theodore B. Olson and David Boies announced they would challenge California’s ban on gay marriages in federal court and take the case all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

It was too risky, the skeptics said. Voters in state after state were rejecting same-sex marriage, and no federal judge had said such bans were illegal. One liberal legal scholar called the lawsuit a “Hail Mary” pass.

169401_prop8_1208_RCG

But now that Proposition 8′s ban on gay marriage is set for a hearing Tuesday before the Supreme Court, the lawyers and activists who started the case think they may be on the verge of a historic victory. Even the early doubters are hopeful. “We think the time is right,” said Los Angeles lawyer Theodore J. Boutrous Jr., Olson’s partner on the case. “Everything seems to be breaking in favor of marriage equality.”

FULL COVERAGE: Same-sex marriage

Olson and Boies are urging the court to rule that gays and lesbians have an equal right to marry under the Constitution, a decision that would not only strike down the California ban but could make gay marriage legal nationwide. That is “the right result,” Boies said last week. “There is no rational or legitimate reason for the government to deny marriage to these loving couples.”

That may go too far for the court’s majority. The conventional wisdom among legal experts is that the court will stop short of declaring that gays and lesbians have a right to marry nationwide. A narrow ruling voiding Proposition 8 would bring gay marriage to California, but it would not force a change in states where strong opposition to the idea remains. Nine states and the District of Columbia authorize same-sex marriages.

VIEW & ADD COMMENTS

2 Comments to “Supreme Court has menu of options in gay marriage case”

    NAVYTOWN said:
    March 25, 2013 at 11:36 AM

    Most young people nowadays don't see any reason why two people of the same sex cannot get married.
    What's the big deal anyway?

      Chris said:
      March 25, 2013 at 3:24 PM

      Some people still hold the idea and the concept of marriage as sacred and defined as a man and women. This goes back to a core religious belief. Unless you're a liberal, these core beliefs are not negotiable. We are doing this for %4 of the population. When are the polygamists going to get their day in court? Why just between 2 people? Why not one man and 3 women?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Advertisement

Advertisement