Local News

Are ‘isolation rooms’ in some school districts going too far?

As the director of the Washington Autism Alliance, Arzu Forough hears a lot of bad stories about special needs students being mistreated in school.

When behavior becomes violent and a student is at risk of hurting themselves or others, Forough said, a teacher can put a child in what’s known as a quiet or isolation room if they have the parents’ permission.

“The rooms I’ve seen are either three-quarter doors or have large windows where the child is visible to the staff member,” Forough said. “There are either bean bags in there or something comfortable for the student to sit on.”

But Forough said the room is a lot different from the padded room being used at Mint Valley Elementary School in Longview.  A concerned parent posted photos of the room after her son told her he saw teachers putting special needs students in the booth for simple things like crying and tapping on their desks.

The district insists the room isn’t used as punishment.

“It is not used as punishment,” said Sandy Catt, communications director for the Longview School District. “It is used as a treatment in lieu of a physical hold or accepted therapeutic restraint for a child.”

Forough feels many districts across the country are out of touch when it comes to working with special needs students. She said rural districts especially may lack the funding for staff and training.

Catt said the children put in the isolation room in Longview all come from a classroom of nine special needs student with a teacher and two aides. The parents of all nine children gave permission for their child to be put in this isolation room, Catt said, and none have complained about its use.

In light of this story, the district is checking in with each of those families to see if they have any concerns.

Seattle Public Schools does not have any isolation rules, but the Kent School District has 14 of them.  In April, an elementary school in Olympia came under fire after a child was allegedly left in an isolation room for hours.

In order for a review of Mint Valley Elementary to happen, State Schools Superintendent Randy Dorn’s office said it would have to receive a formal complaint alleging the school violated state or federal special education laws.

VIEW & ADD COMMENTS

281 Comments to “Are ‘isolation rooms’ in some school districts going too far?”

    Dunnyveg said:
    November 29, 2012 at 12:35 PM

    I'm fifty years old and have had Asperger Syndrome my entire life. I say good for this school district. Disruptive students are unfair to others trying to learn. It is also the case that many of us with AS are extremely talented in one area or another. But without the means of developing those talents, they are essentially wasted. School is that means.

    The only people who could be opposed to reasonable measures by schools to impose the discipline prerequisite to learning are the cultural Marxists who are stuck in some kind of hippie time warp, and want to Bring It All Down.

      anonamoose said:
      November 30, 2012 at 1:24 AM

      Wow those two things are not even close to being the same. That’s just dumb.

    Hazel Bleeker said:
    November 29, 2012 at 12:39 PM

    To those who think these rooms are acceptable, I bet you're really gung-ho for this policy:
    "On August 18, 1939, the Reich Ministry of the Interior circulated a decree compelling all physicians, nurses, and midwives to report newborn infants and children under the age of three who showed signs of severe mental or physical disability. At first only infants and toddlers were incorporated in the effort, but eventually juveniles up to 17 years of age were also killed. Conservative estimates suggest that at least 5,000 physically and mentally disabled children were murdered through starvation or lethal overdose of medication."

      Dunnyveg said:
      November 29, 2012 at 1:05 PM

      Hazel, do you have any idea how many people your communist comrades-in-arms killed? At least ONE HUNDRED MILLION. You leftists really need to get your own act together before you start hypocritically throwing mud at others.

        Hazel Bleeker said:
        November 29, 2012 at 10:46 PM

        Hold yer horses Statist. I'm an anarchist, not a "Leftist". Nice try though.

      Fargin Bastiges said:
      November 30, 2012 at 3:59 AM

      “To those who think these rooms are acceptable, I bet you’re really gung-ho for this policy:…”

      Godwin’s Law, you just lost the debate.

        Hazel Bleeker said:
        November 30, 2012 at 6:38 AM

        It already went there with this topic. I wasn't the first to mention it.

    Dunnyveg said:
    November 29, 2012 at 12:58 PM

    Why does any "documentation" need to be done? I got spanked a few times in school, and records would have done nothing but hurt me and people like me. I just don't understand this leftist fetish for paperwork.

    I'm not sure where you are from, but the schools here in Texas exist to educate, and not punish, students. I think you're making stuff up when you say schools would punish everybody without people like you to stop them.

    As far as Marxists and fascists go, name-calling is the most graceless way of admitting you just lost the argument. It is one more proof that you have nothing intelligent to say. And as Nietzsche used to say, My enemy is the man who destroys without creating himself.

      Lumpy said:
      November 29, 2012 at 8:31 PM

      I went to school in Texas, K-12. Put a child thru a Tx school thru HS as well. Texas schools are run by dictatorial conservative fascists who are more concerned with whether or not a shirt tail is tucked in than teaching.

      They consistently rank in the middle of the pack in nat’l rankings…

      I could go on, but I already did. This native Texan left long ago and now resides in the beautiful mountains of Southern California. :)

      Yeah the taxes are higher. And it’s worth it.

    lisa said:
    November 29, 2012 at 1:30 PM

    If the teachers are not experts in autism, a poorly understood disorder, what are they hoping to accomplish by isolating the children? Maybe behavior modification. However, intermittent solitary confinement pulsed by teachers would not be tolerated for children without special needs for the behaviors described in this article. If the information provided is complete, isolating the students seems cruel and potentially dangerous as any of these children could have a seizure or other serious medical problem while unattended. It also seems questionable and inhumane to isolate children for autistic behaviors, such as pencil-tapping or crying that could overlap the conduct of children without special needs, or mistake behaviors that might agitate the teachers instead for those that need "correction" through isolation.

    Anonymous said:
    November 29, 2012 at 1:45 PM

    Never posted a comment on news stories, always seemed like its best left to the crazies. But I was shocked when I read this story because the school district I attended (graduated in 2008) used rooms even smaller for all students as punishment. There were even 4 in the high school principals office for in-school suspensions. I was once locked in for 3 days, even my lunch was served in “the box”. No parent was ever asked for consent (checked with my parents, and they were just told of the suspension) and my 3 days was considered short. Good to know that’s not the case everywhere.

      SmallRoom said:
      November 29, 2012 at 6:46 PM

      Ironic, I too (graduated 05) was placed for 3 days precisely in a small room the size of 2-office chairs back-to-back without any consent for a in-school-suspension in Middle School (2000) in Arizona. Thought you might find that interesting to know you are certainly not alone in experiencing that in somewhat-recent times

    iambicpentamaster said:
    November 29, 2012 at 1:56 PM

    I don't get it.

    You want them to un-pad the rooms?

    Sounds like someone could get hurt that way…

    Janice said:
    November 29, 2012 at 2:07 PM

    i taught special ed and in several instances, had students who (in every instance, thanks to their parents not giving them their meds) became PHYSICALLY VIOLENT AND DANGEROUS to the other students. We did not have these rooms, so we had to remove all of the other students out of the classroom (if you have never been in a special ed classroom, you will have no idea how difficult and disruptive that can be!) so i could deal with this child. Many times getting torn up in teh process. My fellow teacher had to go to the hospital once b/c an autistic student threw a chair at her head! I can completely understand the use benefit isolation rooms. But every good thing can be abused. The problem here is poor teachers.

    Richard C. Mongler said:
    November 29, 2012 at 2:13 PM

    Furthermore, if anything is disruptive to school it would be the zero tolerance policies relating to fighting.

    More than once in middle school I got suspended for TWO weeks (the max w/o expulsion my school allowed) because another student punched me in view of a teacher, than ran away.

    Of course they got even madder when I stopped caring and just beat the shit out of the bullies, but what could they do they wouldn’t have if I hadn’t.

    Special Ed Teacher said:
    November 29, 2012 at 2:20 PM

    What an ignorant article. I teach in a behavior unit. That means I work with students who are in special education because they have behavior concerns. You need to know that sometimes their own behavior puts themselves and those around them at risk. That woman being concerned that there was no bean bag in there shows that she is not accustomed to working with anyone but her own child. There are very serious things that can happen…even with a bean bag (lets just start with suffocation). I do not know how this district is using these rooms, but this news station is doing a great job of crying fire in a crowded room…and when the state is forced to spend thousands of dollars to investigate just remember that could have been money used to buy YOUR CHILD a book or education blocks or a computer program. This is yet another reason why taxes are raised, but nothing effective ever comes out of it. BOOOO for this article.

    SeanPatriot said:
    November 29, 2012 at 2:44 PM

    Hell yeah, lock those tards up. They should be in a different school anyway

      Roberto said:
      November 29, 2012 at 5:57 PM

      …as a parent if a ‘special needs’ kid and formerly one myself (I was ADHD before ADHD was cool), this is by far the funniest and most insightful comment on this board – I actually laughed out loud, or ‘lol!’as the kids would say!

        ADHDnFriends said:
        November 29, 2012 at 6:49 PM

        haha i agree =)

    AnthonyHill1970 said:
    November 29, 2012 at 2:53 PM

    IT is a time out room. And it is safe for autistic kids. Noise is cut down. Padding keeps them from hurting themselves….A good thing all around.

    guest said:
    November 29, 2012 at 2:55 PM

    Perhaps Temple Grandin should weigh in on this. Mainstreaming children with significant disabilities is very difficult but has its rewards — not only for the mainstreamed child but for those "normal" kids in the class. . I am an advocate of cameras in the classrooms; then parents would better understand conditions that teachers face.

    MEAN MANAGER said:
    November 29, 2012 at 3:14 PM

    I WORKED AS A FACILITIES MANAGER AN HAVE BUILD ROOMS FOR THE SAFETY OF THE STUDENT AND STAFF. I CAN TAKE ANYONE TO 10+ SCHOOLS IN PENNSYLVANIA THAT HAVE THE ROOMS IN USE TODAY. IT"S GREAT.

    VAC said:
    November 29, 2012 at 3:30 PM

    I am a former high school teacher at a public school within an adolescent youth treatment facility. Youth who have mental illness and/or other behavioral problems can be very violent and destructive. In the facility I worked all the teachers wee trained in physical restraint and takedowns, de-escalation techniques and behavioral management. There was a time out room that was used to provide a safe environment free of distractions that was monitored always if a youth was placed in the room. Many times staff would be in the room with the youth to assist in de-escalation, and provide emotional support and encouragement. In the last decide however laws regarding physical restraint have all but eliminated a teachers ability to touch a child, even if threatened, so the use of time out increases to deal with potential outbursts to protect the other students and staff an property from damage from an out of control youth. All of the people I have worked with are 100% dedicated to helping improve these childrens lives and are dedicated professionals. A few instance of misuse of these behavioral tools exists, but do not tear down the behavioral supports for the safety and benefit of these kids based on what ifs. In my experience the training we received and the rules and documentation that are required for any behavioral intervention made it a useful and beneficial tool. Many youth did ask for time out, and some would sit alone or with staff and vent, talk, or blow off steam in a safe and non-disruptive way.

    Wherearetheparents said:
    November 29, 2012 at 3:48 PM

    One simple question: Don't parents notice these things during PARENT-TEACHER CONFERENCES???????

    Parents: "So, our little Bobby is doing well in art and math but is having a little trouble with spelling. Ok, we'll focus on that with him. By the way, WHAT IN THE F*@# IS THAT PADDED CELL FOR??"

      Hazel Bleeker said:
      November 29, 2012 at 10:49 PM

      I doubt it's part of the school tour.

    Ozzy said:
    November 29, 2012 at 3:51 PM

    My son is grown, a Marine… "THIS' proves we have LOST this nation… and NOBODY SEEMS TO CARE!!!

    Mr. JM said:
    November 29, 2012 at 4:37 PM

    Our school had something like it as well, would you rather have the child pick up a chair and throw it across the room and hit another student. Trust me they do it. It's for their safety. Get over it.

      Hazel Bleeker said:
      November 29, 2012 at 10:51 PM

      No, I'd prefer that the para assisting a child with that profound of behavior issues to intervene and not let incidents escalate to that point. It's all about education.

    Crystal said:
    November 29, 2012 at 5:10 PM

    My son is 10 yrs old and autistic. Just yesterday he was placed in a room like this when he had a meltdown in class…started throwing things, threatening to kill everyone around him, and physically lashing out. I do not blame for one moment the adults in the class for doing what they needed to do to keep everyone else safe from him. He is my son and I love him and it breaks my heart when these rare total meltdowns occur. But when they do, I am glad there is a place where he can be where all can be safe until my son calms down. Autism is tough to deal with…especially with boys as they grow bigger and bigger and stronger and stronger. It’s scary, actually.

      Harry Shaw Jr said:
      November 29, 2012 at 5:39 PM

      I feel bad for you that you feel this is an appropriate behavior. My son has had hundreds of instances of various degrees, gotten physical, agressive, out of control etc and after reading all these posts there was NEVER and discussion of use a padded box on.my son because I would have walked him out of that school and never looked back. He has been physically restrained, taken down to the ground and pinned but never stuck in a cage like a rabid sog.

      ThankYOu said:
      November 29, 2012 at 6:57 PM

      @Crystal An exceptional hard working parent with a sound voice of reason and understanding

        Hazel Bleeker said:
        November 29, 2012 at 10:53 PM

        No, a desperate parent who doesn't know what to do because she has limited resources and support.

          Amanda said:
          December 11, 2012 at 8:18 AM

          Hazel Bleeker – you would rather have your child held down then to let them go in a room and calm down? You are crazy!

    GRM said:
    November 29, 2012 at 5:29 PM

    LOL it's called a "Time Out Room" OMFG! Wonder if that's what they call them in prisons?

    Crystal said:
    November 29, 2012 at 5:45 PM

    it’s not a cage…it’s a room. A full-sized room that is provisioned in a thoughtful way so that you can keep your hands OFF the child and NOT have to physically restrain him. You can keep your hands off until the kid calms down. What is the big deal?

    howard_fein said:
    November 29, 2012 at 6:05 PM

    I would have killed to get a padded private room back in high school . . .

    Reader11722 said:
    November 29, 2012 at 6:55 PM

    Useless, overpaid abusive teachers, yet another violation of our rights. The gov’t constantly violates our rights.
    They violate the 1st Amendment by caging protesters and banning books like “America Deceived II”.
    They violate the 4th and 5th Amendment by allowing TSA to grope you.
    They violate the entire Constitution by starting undeclared wars.
    Impeach Obama.
    Last link of “America Deceived II” before it is completely banned: http://www.amazon.com/America-Deceived-II-Possess

    bill said:
    November 29, 2012 at 7:02 PM

    once again liberal policies bring disaster.
    Libtards wanted to pretend people with handicaps are no different so they shut down schools geared towards helping them and stuck them in regular schools.
    Once demcorats got their way and it hurts everyone involved.

      barcaa1 said:
      December 2, 2012 at 9:37 PM

      Just because a child is Autistic does not me he should be shoved into a school where addition and reading might be taught in high school. What do they teach if they don't teach the basics? By the way, districts schools have to choose to let your child attend these schools. I guess you would rather see kids tucked away in out of sight. Maybe they don't matter just because they need help to learn to control their issues. Maybe leper colonies for those who don't seem good enough to be in "YOUR" schools. Autism does not equal retard. I've seen him put adult to shame when he could figure out problems they couldn't. The first time was before he learned to talk.

    Trash talker said:
    November 29, 2012 at 7:26 PM

    Realitybites is an idiot. It posts this kind of trash on blog pages.

    TDL said:
    November 29, 2012 at 9:16 PM

    Heh, I remember getting put into isolation at school. Their version was an unheated room with a bare cement floor with a drain in the middle, a locked metal door, a slit window, unpainted cement block walls and no lighting (beyond the window) in the basement.

    Little Chute Middle School was such a joyous experience. The guidance counselor was even arrested for molestation during my tenure at that esteemed institution.

      Hazel Bleeker said:
      November 29, 2012 at 10:55 PM

      Sounds like a great place. Let's use that for a model.

      barcaa1 said:
      December 2, 2012 at 9:59 PM

      Parents get put in jail for less atrocities than committed by schools. Parents need to question what really provokes meltdowns. I asked those questions and watched as the teacher went to a look of "duh". In slow, small words, I ask what was happening before, during and after. I come to figure out that the teaching was not following the IEP. Why not? Especially when he was supposed to have an Aide. Violated IEP, again. His IEP called for and his insurance paid for a personal aide, but she was not actually helping him or even in sight. He didn't hurt anyone, just curled in a ball in fear.

    Evan said:
    November 29, 2012 at 11:58 PM

    If you were my teacher and you put me in there, when i got out i would probably shank you hows that for discipline. corporal punishment only begets aggressive behavior because the punishment itself is a violent form of control. whatever happened to communicating and explaining, you Neanderthals incapable of progressing beyond using your simple limbic brains.. who ever thought of this SHOULD BE SHOT. of go back to smacking to rocks together in a field somewhere the people who invented civil society would be appalled

    Jimmie said:
    November 30, 2012 at 5:20 AM

    Why not drug them….they drug the bright kids….why not these kids?

    chuck said:
    November 30, 2012 at 10:06 AM

    I have a three-year-old who, due to a speech delay issue, has been allowed to attend preschool at a public school nearby. I don't know if I'd describe him as "special needs" — he definitely isn't autistic, but beyond that, because he's our first kid, he seems mostly normal to us, just a little behind his peers maybe. Anyway, like a lot of small children, he is still learning to deal with his emotions when things don't go his way and he is prone to lashing out physically. My wife's arms have been constantly all scratched up. What we found, from home experience, was that sometimes the only effective thing to calm him down when he loses his cool is to put him in his room alone for a few minutes, sometimes with the lights off. He'll inevitably destroy his room, throw toys, knock over lamps, break stuff, but once he's vented his rage and had a few minutes of quiet time away from the situation that set him off, he comes out much happier, and over time his incidents have gotten much less frequent. I can totally get why this works — I can relate to it. Sometimes when I get really pissed I just want to go somewhere quiet and get away from the noise of people so I can chill out.

    His preschool teachers asked us to give written consent to place him in "time-out" when he flies off the handle at school, and since this seemed like much the same thing we were doing at home anyway, we consented. We are told he is placed in a room by himself for two minutes. At home we were usually giving him more like ten, so I was skeptical this would even be long enough. We receive a report daily of every incidence of this techniques' use and why (invariably it has been physically attacking a teacher).

    I haven't seen the actual room and don't know if it looks like the one in this picture, but I can assume that they don't just use a regular room like the teacher's office or a supply closet or an place that contains objects for him to throw and break or sharp corners or hard surfaces to hurt himself on — after all, you just know the first time a kid got injured in such a situation a parent would probably try to sue the pants off the school district over it. Another technique that sometimes works when kids are having this kind of behavior issue is therapeutically holding them in a way that they both are restrained and feel safe. But you can just imagine the liability issues there too, first time there's an accident while a teacher does that, teacher's getting sued. So a room like this seems like the best option.

    It is obvious to me that this is not like the padded rooms in our horror fantasies of mental institutions, nor is it like prison solitary confinement, and I don't think you can even call it "isolation" when it's only for a couple minutes. It would be quite another manner if kids were being put in there and ignored all day. I would never consent to that. I think all of this is getting really blown out of proportion.

    Bottom line though, if you don't trust your kid's school and teachers, you shouldn't be sending your kid there — And if you don't _know_ whether or not to trust them, you should be communicating with them more and taking a more active role in your kid's schooling. As questions, pay attention to what's going on, don't jump to conclusions. These people are, after all, trained professionals.

      chuck said:
      November 30, 2012 at 10:08 AM

      Furthermore, I'd like to point out that, since we've consented to this at his school, the incidence of it has been steadily decreasing, his behavior both at school and at home is steadily improving, and he is becoming steadily better at dealing with things.

    Concerned relative said:
    December 2, 2012 at 6:56 PM

    I'm a sister of an adult with a developmental disability (not violent however often moody) and special Ed assistant and this story gives me a very uneasy feeling….I have seen outbursts and been hit and kicked and spat on by kids but I don't believe that these "isolation rooms" are the answer! There are varying types of developmental differences in people even Autism or other developmental disabilities can't be classified as one type of people. I've worked with kids and adults with many different "special needs". Many people on the autism spectrum are also sensory sensitive meaning that certain noises, lights, touches may be very scary or even hurtful to them. They also often need to move around a lot and you'll find they have a hard time looking at your eyes when you talk to them BUT they're most likely listening in fact they could probably repeat it back word for word, if they're verbal, some are not. You'll see some kids on the autism spectrum wearing headphones to muffle the sounds around them or they'll wear a weighted vest to help them feel more grounded or sunglasses even inside especially near fluorescent lights. I do know of some people who like small tight spaces but not being locked up! The weighted vest or a lap pad has a similar effect to squishing themselves in a corner(which I've seen kids do when they're upset) but w/o excluding them from the group. Many schools I work at have "sensory rooms" they're nothing like these boxes…instead they're very open and with lots of windows and they're never left alone in fact often they're there with lots of other kids who are also sensory sensitive. In these rooms there's many tools to help alleviate their sensory needs. There's cushions/mats, music, swings, climbing apparatus', fidget toys, etc. I don't know, I understand that when certain children are lashing out it is dangerous and I have had to restrain a child who became violent on a pool deck to protect him and others around him and in the process was hit, kicked, spat on and called many names but I think a room like this would've made things worse in the long run, he eventually calmed down…

    We all have our differences and some are greater than others. I guess we've come a long way but we still have an exhaustive road ahead.

    Concerned relative said:
    December 2, 2012 at 7:10 PM

    I'm a special Ed assistant and this story gives me a very uneasy feeling….I have seen outbursts and been hit and kicked and spat on by kids but I don't believe that these "isolation rooms" are the answer! There are varying types of developmental differences in people even Autism or other developmental disabilities can't be classified as one type of people. I've worked with kids and adults with many different "special needs". Many people on the autism spectrum are also sensory sensitive meaning that certain noises, lights, touches may be very scary or even hurtful to them. They also often need to move around a lot and you'll find they have a hard time looking at your eyes when you talk to them BUT they're most likely listening in fact they could probably repeat it back word for word, if they're verbal, some are not. You'll see some kids on the autism spectrum wearing headphones to muffle the sounds around them or they'll wear a weighted vest to help them feel more grounded or sunglasses even inside especially near fluorescent lights. I do know of some people who like small tight spaces but not being locked up! The weighted vest or a lap pad has a similar effect to squishing themselves in a corner(which I've seen kids do when they're upset) but w/o excluding them from the group. Many schools I work at have "sensory rooms" they're nothing like these boxes…instead they're very open and with lots of windows and they're never left alone in fact often they're there with lots of other kids who are also sensory sensitive. In these rooms there's many tools to help alleviate their sensory needs. There's cushions/mats, music, swings, climbing apparatus', fidget toys, etc. I don't know, I understand that when certain children are lashing out it is dangerous and I have had to hold a child down who became violent on a pool deck (after trying to talk to him/at least have him come to a safer place) to protect him and others around him and in the process was hit, kicked, spat on and called many names but I think a room like this would've made things worse in the long run, he eventually calmed down….

    We all have our differences and some are greater than others. I guess we've come a long way but we still have an exhaustive road ahead.

    Concerned relative said:
    December 2, 2012 at 7:15 PM

    I'm a special Ed assistant and this story gives me a very uneasy feeling….I have seen outbursts and been hit and kicked and spat on by kids but I don't believe that these "isolation rooms" are the answer! There are varying types of developmental differences in people even Autism or other developmental disabilities can't be classified as one type of people. I've worked with kids and adults with many different "special needs". Many people on the autism spectrum are also sensory sensitive meaning that certain noises, lights, touches may be very scary or even hurtful to them. They also often need to move around a lot and you'll find they have a hard time looking at your eyes when you talk to them BUT they're most likely listening in fact they could probably repeat it back word for word, if they're verbal, some are not. You'll see some kids on the autism spectrum wearing headphones to muffle the sounds around them or they'll wear a weighted vest to help them feel more grounded or sunglasses even inside especially near fluorescent lights. I do know of some people who like small tight spaces but not being locked up! The weighted vest or a lap pad has a similar effect to squishing themselves in a corner(which I've seen kids do when they're upset) but w/o excluding them from the group. Many schools I work at have "sensory rooms" they're nothing like these boxes…instead they're very open and with lots of windows and they're never left alone in fact often they're there with lots of other kids who are also sensory sensitive. In these rooms there's many tools to help alleviate their sensory needs. There's cushions/mats, music, swings, climbing apparatus', fidget toys, etc. I don't know, I understand that when certain children are lashing out it is dangerous and I have had to restrain a child who became violent on a pool deck to protect him and others around him (after trying to talk with him or at the very least to convince him to move to a safer place) and in the process was hit, kicked, spat on and called many names but I think a room like this would've made things worse in the long run, he eventually calmed down…

    We all have our differences and some are greater than others. I guess we've come a long way but we still have an exhaustive road ahead.

    barcaa1 said:
    December 2, 2012 at 9:22 PM

    These situations are more common than one might think. What happens when your child has problems, but is able to read, write and complete school work. Schools want to shove them in with kids who might get to addition or reading in high school…MIGHT. I guess first grade is potty training (accomplished a three) and paper airplanes….no academics could be begged out. For those children, school is a nightmare. I mean a literal nightmare. My son has been placed in rooms where the rooms are padlocked. What happens if there is a fire? You know the answer!! Placement with kids who are much lower functioning can be terrifying. I have been searching for years for an appropriate placement, but one incident pushed matters over the edge.

    barcaa1 said:
    December 2, 2012 at 9:23 PM

    The final straw came when I found out they were using crisis management without informing me. Worse yet, his siblings were being brought is to view the action. They were afraid to tell me what was happening, but ran to their rooms night after night crying. I decided notes to teacher, calls and iep meetings were not good enough. I just went to the school unannounced. Just happened they were having a horrible problem with my son. He had bruises and was hiding under a desk. He was white as a ghost, could not talk or recognize me. Scared me to death and I just started crying. I picked him, told the school psychologist to get away when she wanted me to sign him out and took my son to the ER.

    barcaa1 said:
    December 2, 2012 at 9:25 PM

    He had only been in the district six months, but their actions can be seen two years later. Where was the AIDE that his insurance pays for…nowhere to be found!!! I HATE them for their reckless actions. I took all out of school and into PACYBER. We have suffered ever since. Every time he cries because he doesnt feel safe out of his room, he suffers. All he has is the math and reading that makes him too advanced for the schools supposedly geared toward Autistic kids. Even his relationship with his brother and sisters has suffered because they thought little kids would be more competent than them. I called CYS and the Department of Education, what happened absolutely nothing. Schools think the are above the law, it must STOP!!!!!!

    Amanda said:
    December 11, 2012 at 8:30 AM

    I totally agree with you Crystal. I have a son who has behavior issues and is in a behavior ESE class. I would much rather him go in the room and calm down, then to be retrained to keep from hurting himself or others. At home when he has an episode he is allowed to go to his room to calm down. Also, for those who have commented on here saying that the parents of children with behavior issues don't care and just send them to school for a break, have no idea what they are talking about. Parents who don't have children with these issues have no idea what a day is like. Just because we want our children to have a education like other children. Children with behavior issues need a chance to learn how to function on a day to day basis.

    polnick said:
    January 12, 2013 at 2:43 PM

    Students that cannot read and write by twelve should be booted out of school and given a welfare check; those that remain can be trained to become a part of the workforce. The high costs of attempting to educate the terminally stupid would be finally ended.

    TwoSidestoEveryCoin said:
    January 17, 2013 at 10:03 PM

    We didn't ask for our children to be different, however we are asking for their civil liberties to be upheld. The country was vocal and contributed to deciding our current education system. No one knew the rate at which children being diagnosed with Autism was going to rise so fast. Its not our fault that our Goverment was obviously not ready for such a rise. That being said, it doesn't matter our kid has every right to a fair and equal education.

    To every parent your child is special but, let me be clear and say that none of your children are so special that my child deserves to be denied equal rights under the constitution.

    One person on here had the audacity to say that " certain autistic children" need to be removed from regular school because they are impeding the education of other peoples children.

    My response : Your worst problem for your child's education is that her learning is occasionally disrupted by a special needs child. The worst part for me is that I wish my child were able to be distracted because that would mean that he was focusing on something to be distracted from in the first place.

    I have two children and I love them equally.
    Even though people like you think they are an inconvienence to your children.

    I have one child with autism and one child who has no learning delays or disabilities so, I know what it feels like to have a child that isn't special needs and I realize what we are asking for when our child disrupts a class. Its you that have no clue what you are talking about and until you walk a mile in my shoes I don't want to hear a single thing you have got to say about it.

    Per the current debate –

    The PROBLEM IS NOT THAT everyone wants TO DO THE RIGHT THING but that you believe there is one wrong way or one right way. Whatever is best for the child is the right way.

    Different children respond to different things. And instead of voting yes or no on the policy you need to put a evaluation into place so that the school knows which individuals the time out room will be beneficial for and which it might be detrimental for.

    In my family's case my son freaked out with any confined space, when he was upset he liked to be outside or by the window so he could see outside. That was calming for him and thats fine because I knew what did and didn't make him happy.

    So I believe and support that a child can and will let you know what helps them, even without words they have a voice.

    The only part about this debate that makes me feel as though anyone wants to treat these children like animals is their one size fits all solution. They are not going to all react the same way and to assume they will and decide on one protocol is absolutely inhuman.

    Also I would like to point out that even though there seem to be as many people on these boards standing up for children with autism there are just as many who don't believe that this is a case in which they need to be stood up for. Everyone is entitled to their opinion but, then I have to ask " Why is it that in such close opposition that the posts of those who believe its wrong to do this to children are voted negative twice as much as the posts insisting that this is not an issue in which these children need protection.

    Maybe they are just a little more tolerant of you then you are of them. And maybe just maybe if people took any time to think about that it would make the world we live in a far better place.

    David Maher said:
    February 17, 2013 at 3:59 AM

    I am from Ireland you know the place "Emerald Isle" where we are famous for our saints and scholars. My Son has autism and they installed and electronic lock down system in his class room without consultation with the parents! So to make a comment, I am disgraced at the padded cell you guys are commenting on and equally disgraced that it is taken as the norm to treat our child like animals. There simply is no excuse for this carry on in 2013. My advice; do not accept this and get rid of it.

    Pok said:
    March 25, 2013 at 12:30 PM

    I precisely wanted to say thanks again. I'm not certain the things I would have undertaken in the absence of these tips and hints revealed by you concerning my subject. Previously it was a real distressing issue for me, however , being able to view the expert form you dealt with that made me to leap for contentment. Now i am happier for the work and thus sincerely hope you recognize what an amazing job that you're putting in training the others with the aid of your webpage. Probably you've never got to know all of us.

    Kristina Edwards said:
    April 2, 2013 at 12:05 PM

    i am currently dealing with this issue. My son was held in this time out box for more than an hour on the 28th with no water, food, or bathroom. they even denied my to speak with him. we are being told we have no choice but to allow this type of punishment. i honestly dont know what to do.

    Betty said:
    June 11, 2013 at 11:19 PM

    these kids should first be punished, spanked etc., then locked away. They should then be beaten again once they are allowed out of their cell.

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